The Bridges of Juniata County — 52 Pickup

By Timothy B. Barner

I was cleaning out a portion of an upstairs bedroom in the house I grew up in. This section of bedroom was piled high with all manner of… stuff: pictures, window shades, board games, a stamp collection, dishes, metal shelves, and so much more. My father had been a pack rat. […]

The Bridges of Juniata County — 52 Pickup
East Oriental Covered Bridge. Photo taken by Janis Ford in 2013

This post came about a couple days ago and it looks at the covered bridges in Juniata County in central Pennsylvania, written from a journalist’s point of view when he grew up in the region. Some of the bridges mentioned in his piece (click in the link above the picture) no longer exist, but the information on the dimensions and dates can be found here, courtesy of bridgehunter.com. Enjoy the facts and stories behind the bridges in the county. 🙂

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BHC Pic of the Week Nr. 163 Tribute to James Baughn

In reference to the latest news story in the BHC Newsflyer from yesterday on how buildings are being recycled and reused as bridges (click here to listen to the podcast and see the video), here’s a very weird way of saving a piece of history that James Baughn found during one of his bridgehunting tours from three years ago. It’s an old farmstead in Missouri that features a unique X-lattice vertical beam that is used as one of the entry columns. When and how it was erected, let alone why the owner chose this piece of metal as a decoration remains open. Any ideas of where this is located and from which bridge the piece came from, feel free to comment.

Some of these bridges have ended up becoming decorations instead of being either recycled or placed in a heap of scrap metal. In a couple cases, one or more of the spans have been converted into houses or other places of living. One of the best examples is the use of a railroad bridge in South Africa as a hotel. That has been opened to business and provides an excellent view of the Kruger National Wildlife Preserves. Another one being planned is using one of the spans of the cantilever portion of the Bay Bridge between San Francisco and Oakland to be converted into a house. If we find creative ways of reusing truss bridges instead of scrapping them, we may be able to save money in terms of demolition and transportation costs for the metal and we will definitely reduce the amount of carbon dioxide used for the two purposes. Even if the bridge is for decoration purposes, it’s better than scrapping the metal.

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And now the answer to last week’s question for the forum.

The bridge at hand is the Ledbetter Truss Bridge. also known as the Clark Memorial Bridge. The three-span through truss bridge used to span the Tennessee River at the McCracken-Livingston County border and was built by Modjeski and Masters in 1931. It was bypassed by a replacement structure in 2013. Attempts to convert the bridge into a pedestrian bridge failed when sections of the approach span collapsed on June 24, 2014. The bridge was promptly removed two months later in September 2014. Had there been a chance, this bridge may have been converted into a house, but most likely on land, due to the instability of the piers that caused the bridge to collapse. Still the key word that led to its demise was liability. Liability is the curse word for historic preservation because of its extensive use by proponents of demolition. Nine out of ten cases for demolishing a bridge has this excuse in there, without thinking of the long-term benefits of preserving a bridge, let alone the energy and finances used for demolishing the bridge and its impact on the environment.

This leads to my question to all is: Who will be liable if we keep continuing the business as usual approach and we destroy our planet?

The question was poised by Greta Thunberg and has since been spreading around. Now it’s my turn to pose this question: Who will be liable if we continue making waste for a pretty and new bridge that we exploit the resources to build, instead of just reusing the bridge or try different approaches that uses recycled materials? This is a question that we’ve ignored for too long, but the time is more than ripe to embrace it and find answers to it- and quick.

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BHC Newsflyer: 17 October 2021

Prince Alfred Viaduct in Gundagai, Australia- In its final days. Source: Bidgee, CC BY-SA 3.0 AU https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/au/deed.en, via Wikimedia Commons

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To listen to the podcast, click here

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Headlines

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Days of Gundagai Viaduct Numbered- Demolition Expected in November

Link: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-10-10/prince-alfred-bridge-demolition-gundagai-nsw/100523082

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Green Bridge in Waverly, IA to be Removed:

https://wcfcourier.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/waverly-council-puts-final-nail-in-coffin-for-citys-green-bridge/article_90389a89-167d-535a-a3ea-df76cb3fd96f.html

Bridge Information: http://bridgehunter.com/ia/bremer/12250/

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Historic Hardwick Bridge in CO to get a Facelift

Link: https://www.postindependent.com/news/historic-hardwick-bridge-to-get-facelift-in-trail-development-project/

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Source: Bidgee, CC BY-SA 3.0 AU https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/au/deed.en, via Wikimedia Commons

Historic Bonner Bridge Pier Open to the Public

Link: https://www.wral.com/final-remnant-of-historic-bridge-first-connection-to-hatteras-island-opens-as-public-pier/19903081/

Bridge Information: http://bridgehunter.com/nc/dare/bonner/

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Colve Truss Bridge in Germany to be Torn Down Earlier than Planned.

Link: https://www.radioduisburg.de/artikel/coelve-bruecke-loesung-fuer-zugstrecke-1099709.html

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Building a Bridge using a Recycled Building

Link (D): https://www.fireworld.at/2021/10/12/recycling-bruecke-ohne-betonieren-in-fribourg-realisiert/

Link (EN): https://innovationorigins.com/en/selected/building-out-of-concrete-but-without-pouring-concrete/

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Pooh Bear’s Wooden Bridge Auctioned

Link: https://www.rnd.de/panorama/winnie-pooh-bruecke-in-england-fuer-131-000-pfund-versteigert-3CBUYQ6AYYGA37CJITOTXBFNXM.html

Information on Winnie the Pooh (with links to the Milnes): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winnie-the-Pooh

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On this day (Australia): In 1970, a portion of the West Gate Bridge in Melbourne collapsed, killing 35 people — Craig Hill

West Gate Bridge Collapse On 15 October 1970, a portion of the West Gate Bridge in Melbourne collapsed, killing 35 people. The West Gate Bridge is a steel box girder cable-stayed bridge in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, spanning the Yarra River just north of its mouth into Port Phillip. It is a vital link between the inner city (CBD) and Melbourne’s western suburbs, with […]

On this day (Australia): In 1970, a portion of the West Gate Bridge in Melbourne collapsed, killing 35 people — Craig Hill

Culloden Viaduct — My Plaid Heart

It is so much fun to drive the narrow, single-track roads through Scotland’s countryside. Not only is the scenery beautiful, but it’s along those routes that you often find the best surprises. On this day, the surprise was Culloden Viaduct. Culloden Viaduct (also known as Nairn Viaduct) lies about seven miles east of Inverness and […]

Culloden Viaduct — My Plaid Heart

BHC Pic of the Week Nr. 162 Tribute to James Baughn

We’re playing catch-up with our BHC Pic of the Week due to non-bridge-related commitments that have kept me from keeping up with the weekly tradition.

We would like to show you one of the pics taken by James Baughn five years ago. It was a multiple-span Parker through truss bridge with riveted connections and A-frame portal bracings. It was built in the 1930s but was bypassed with a newer structure in ca. 2010 and had sat there awaiting for rehabilitation and repurposing as a pedestrian bridge. Unfortunately, its fate was sealed when three approach spans on one side of the river collapsed and it was subsequentially fenced off. It only took less than a month until it was torn down in 2016.

Does anybody have an idea what the name of the bridge is and where it is located?

Feel free to comment in the section below or on BHC’s facebook pages. The answer will come in the next week. Happy Bridgehunting, folks! 🙂

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Pamban Bridge: All you need to know about India’s new sea Bridge — Ground Report

Indian Railways is building country’s first vertical-lift bridge connecting Rameswaram in Arabian Sea to mainland India that will allow ships and steamers to pass through without any hindrance. Union Railway minister shared stunning pics of this under construction bridge. He said this will be operational by March 2022 New Pamban Bridge: Facts It will be… Read…

Pamban Bridge: All you need to know about India’s new sea Bridge — Ground Report

The Old Fairy Bridge of the Isle of Man (and how to find it) — RANDOM Times •

Locals of the Isle of Man are well acquainted with the folklore around the so-called Fairy Bridge on the A5 between Ballasalla and Newtown. Local superstitions state that those who do not greet the bridge’s fey inhabitants with something like “Hello, fairies!” as they pass over it may fall prey to their malicious, mischievous whims.…

The Old Fairy Bridge of the Isle of Man (and how to find it) — RANDOM Times •

The History Of A Ruin — Old Structures Engineering

There are a number of common histories for buildings. The happiest is construction->continuous_use. Frankly, that’s less common than it should be. A history that we encounter a lot in our work is construction->use->decay->restoration->new_use. Sometimes there are two or more cycles of disinvestment and restoration, which I find maddening: ordinary maintenance would be cheaper and less […]

The History Of A Ruin — Old Structures Engineering

Joseph Ross, 19th Century Ipswich bridge builder — Historic Ipswich

Joseph Ross (1822-1903) is best known for designing the first movable span bridge in the country, which he patented in 1849 at the age of 26, and became the most common railroad bridge type in the Boston area. His corporation Joseph Ross & Sons was highly successful.

Joseph Ross, 19th Century Ipswich bridge builder — Historic Ipswich