Bridge Genre/Media Tip: Everything About the Brooklyn Bridge

Photo by Chris Molloy on Pexels.com

.

.

A few years ago, I received a 500+ page book on the history of the Brooklyn Bridge by David McCullough as a Christmas gift. The title was The Great Bridge. Mr. McCullough had spent over a decade doing research on the life of the bridge builder, John Roebling, who had designed the bridge and his son, Washington, who directed the construction of the bridge even when he was bed-ridden for much of the construction. Then there is the design of the bridge, the construction and of course after the casualties behind the bridge build, the grand opening of the bridge. McCullough focused directly on the facts, hitting every point but in full detail. If one has the time and wants to bury himself into the research, the book by McCullough would be the best bet.

Recently though, a pair of podcasts were presented about the Brooklyn Bridge but from different angles, those that were not addressed in the book by McCullough. Dr. Greg Jackson is the host of History that Doesn’t Suck (HTDS), a podcast that looks at the aspects of American History that is often seldomly discussed in the classroom. Greg is Assistant Professor of Integrated Studies and Assistant Director of National Security Studies at Utah Valley University, where he teaches courses spanning US, European, and Middle Eastern history. For many years, he has done extensive research on the life of the Roebling Family and how each of the family members played a contributing role in the construction of one of New York City’s oldest and most popular icon.  One of them was Washington Washington’s wife, Emily, who was “acting” engineer when her husband was bed-ridden, but was never recognized when the bridge opened to traffic in 1883.

Greg did a podcast on the Roebling family, which you can listen to by accessing the link here:

https://open.spotify.com/embed/episode/1W9a3Bl8kvXoZktedtl387?utm_source=generator

.

A month ago, another podcaster, going by the name of Infrastructure Junkies, did a two-part interview with Greg about the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge with some other aspects that have up til now not been mentioned. He ties it in with the life of the Roebling family and their roles behind the bridge. The podcast has two parts:

Part 1: https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-wwif3-110f22e

Part 2: https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-ivz84-10fd5a6

The BHC has nominated the podcast crew of Infrastructure Junkies and HTDS as well as David McCullough for this year’s Bridgehunter Awards in the category Bridge Media and Genre for their extensive work on this project. On a personal level, I have never learned as much as I have with this topic and being a man of full detail it is important when writing a book or doing a podcast, one has to cover all the exits with the detail, but in a way that it is interesting to the audience. They indeed did just that.

.

.

Will this in mind, congratulations on the nomination and we’ll see how the voting turns out. Voting starts after the final submissions are in by December 1st. Information on how to enter is here.

.

.

BHC Newsflyer: 27 November 2021

The Tenth Avenue (Cedar Avenue) Bridge in Minneapolis. Photo taken in 2009 before the rehabilitation project

.

To listen to the podcast, click here.

.

.

Headlines:

Council Agrees to Readdress the Issue Involving the Future of a Local Historic Bridge in Ontario

Police Looking for Vandals who Looted the Historic Richardsville Bridge

https://www.wbko.com/2021/11/22/historic-old-richardsville-road-bridge-vandalized-with-obscene-graffitti/

.

.

Historic Bridge in Minneapolis Reopens after Receiving Much-Needed Facelift

https://www.startribune.com/10th-avenue-bridge-in-minneapolis-reopens-after-60m-makeover/600117418/

.

.

Historic Bridge in Wales Washed Away in Recent Storms

https://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/historic-bridge-washed-away-might-22252956

.

.

Historic Truss Bridge in New York has a New Home

https://www.wwnytv.com/2021/11/24/old-bridge-gets-new-life-hopkinton/

.

.

.

December 1st is your last day to submit your entries to the 2021 Bridgehunter Awards. Information and Contact Details here.

.

.

Reminder: Shots Save Lives! Let’s End the Corona Epidemic!! Get the Shot!!!

.

.

💉🌉BHC

A Bicycle Tour of Twin Cities Lift and Swing Bridges — streets.mn

The history of European settlement in the Twin Cities is a story of rivers and rails. St. Paul, the northernmost port on the Mississippi River, owes its existence to river commerce. 2,346 more words

A Bicycle Tour of Twin Cities Lift and Swing Bridges — streets.mn

Infrastructure Funding Boost Puts Historic Bridges At Risk

Here’s a look at the negative impacts of Biden’s Infrastructure Bill on America’s Historic Bridges. Will they benefit from this or will it be the last nail in the coffin? Feel free to comment.

I, Beckerman, not Robot

President Biden speaks about his infrastructure bill at a bridge across the Pemigewasset River in Woodstock, N.H., which has been declared “structurally unsafe.

Historic bridges get no love, at least not from the civil engineering community.If you are a civil engineer, especially a bridge engineer, historic bridges are nothing but headaches.The concrete ones are probably rotted from the inside out, with outmoded and salt-ravaged rebar.The metal ones are riveted. Who does riveting anymore?There may be material loss from rusting.For some of the older ones, no one knows how they function.This isn’t taught in schools any more.For the average engineer, the numbers for rehabilitation don’t work.By the time the bridge gets to the attention of the design team, the bridge probably hasn’t been rehabilitated for 40-50 years.It is unlikely to have been maintained for the last 30 years.Neglect takes its toll.A proper rehab might give another 40 years of life…

View original post 1,653 more words

This Is Where the States Want Billions in Infrastructure Funding Spent — The New York City Daily Post

[ad_1] SACRAMENTO — On the highway over the Teton Pass in Wyoming, avalanches have been threatening motorists since the 1960s. In Washington and Oregon, drivers live with the daily awareness that, in a major earthquake, the bridge between Vancouver and Portland will probably collapse. In California, residents are increasingly at the mercy of out-of-control wildfires […]

This Is Where the States Want Billions in Infrastructure Funding Spent — The New York City Daily Post

BHC Pic of the Week Nr. 167 Tribute to James Baughn

The 167th Pic of the Week has a perfect fall setting that was photographed by James Baughn in 2017. The bridge in the foreground however, as easy as you can access it, may be in danger of collapse.  This crossing is located across Blackwater River at McAllister Springs Access and features a Parker through truss span with Howe lattice portal bracings supported by curved heels. It’s near the village of Hustonia in Saline County, Missouri. The bridge has eight panels and has a length of between 160 and 190 feet. While there is no information on the date of construction, the pinned connections and the portals indicate a build date between 1890 and 1910.

At the time of the photo, the bridge was in a balancing act with the brick abutments cracking and spalling thanks to a tree that grew through it. Furthermore, the decking has rotted away to a point where the lower chords have been exposed. Some of lower beams have been shifted or are missing. Trees have landed on the bridge with branches found on the top chord and on the stringers. And lastly, the approach spans have disappeared with only V-laced columns dangling from the abutments. Another flood or two will seal the deal and put the bridge into the water. If that doesn’t happen, then most likely the bridge may collapse under its own weight. This happened with the Schell City Bridge in 2012 after years of abandonment, even though the decking was all but intact. Further photos taken this year shows a worsening state of the bridge. Click here to view.

The only way this bridge could be saved is if it is dismantled and restored in parts and built on new abutments as the old ones cannot be salvaged. Furthermore, it would have to be relocated to a better site where people can access the bridge. If and whether it is possible depends on the funding available but also the interest. Even if it was put into storage, it would be better than to just simply remove it.

The McAllister Truss Bridge is a bridge full of surprises, with history to be found on it and ways to preserve it. Yet it is a bridge in need of help and it hoped that someone will come to its rescue before Mother Nature finishes it with the next flood.

.

.

The Quiet Life — Old Structures Engineering

There are two reasons that I chose to write about the Wisconsin-Michigan Railroad Bridge over the Menominee River between the two states. The first reason is that it’s a good example of the small truss bridges that were built everywhere in the US in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Wagner, Wisconsin, and Lake, […]

The Quiet Life — Old Structures Engineering

Without Visual Hierarchy — Old Structures Engineering

Vierendeel trusses are misnamed. They’re really frames, not trusses. In ordinary trusses, most or all of the members are designed for primary stress consisting of axial load, while every piece of a vierendeel, by definition, has bending. But they have been used (when they’ve been used, which is not that often) in the same places […]

Without Visual Hierarchy — Old Structures Engineering

Pocket Curiosity: East LaPort Footbridge, Plymouth Indiana — TG Wolff

Hidden amid the lush green on the banks of the Yellow River in Plymouth, Indiana is a footbridge. This bridge was constructed in 1898 by the Rochester Bridge Company, according to it’s Wikipedia page, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1981. What qualifies this bridge was a pocket curiosity? It […]

Pocket Curiosity: East LaPort Footbridge, Plymouth Indiana — TG Wolff

Dronie Sunday – 21 November 2021 — Journeys with Johnbo

Cartwright, North Dakota. Dronies are my term to use for any image captured with a drone. Dronie Sunday is a subset of Cellpic Sunday, just pointing out that the image wasn’t captured with a cell phone. You have to agree, however, that a drone is a truly mobile device (once it’s launched anyway.) One of […]

Dronie Sunday – 21 November 2021 — Journeys with Johnbo