Mid-Week Monochrome #60 – Bridge at Russell Gardens — Brashley Photography

A photograph of one of the bridges at Russell Gardens near Kearsney Abbey in Dover Kent. Camera Settings Camera: Panasonic Lumix FZ-48Lens: n/aF/Number: f/4.0ISO: 100 Focal Distance: 7.6 mmShutter Speed: 1/160 secSoftware: Adobe Lightroom Classic My sincere apologies… I seem to go missing a lot lately.. real life had things planned differently to what I […]

Mid-Week Monochrome #60 – Bridge at Russell Gardens — Brashley Photography

The Bridge —

By Lesley Baker He still slowed down when he approached the bridge, holding his stick that little bit tighter and leaning into his walk to make it across, his old white dog beside him. Half-way over the sight of the wildly fierce and defiant dandelions, laced through the bars, overlooking the motorway, stopped him. Bars […]

The Bridge —

Mystery Bridge Nr. 155- An Unusual Vierendeel Bridge in Missouri

Our 155th Mystery Bridge takes us to Vulcan, in Missouri and this unusual bridge. The bridge was built by Missouri Pacific Railroad in 1949 and spans not only Highway BB but also a small stream running alongside it. The bridge was built using concrete and features a rather unusual style that is similar to a rare truss design, the Vierendeel.

Arthur Vierendeel patented the design and it consists of trusses where only the vertical beam supports the upper and lower chords of the truss. Normally, truss bridges use triangular beams, consisting of a combination of vertical and diagonal beams needed to support the span. Because of the lack of diagonal members, Vierendeel trusses employ moment joints to resist substantial bending forces.. Vierendeel trusses are more common in Europe, with most of the trusses being located in Belgium. This includes the first truss built in 1902 at AvelgemBelgium. Most of the spans can be found in and around the metropolitan areas of Brussels and Antwerp. While Vierendeels are seldom to be found in the United States, the city of Glendale, California has three Vierendeel truss bridges: the Geneva Street, Kenilworth Avenue, and Glenoaks Boulevard bridges, all two-lane bridges spanning 95 feet. They were built in 1937 as part of the Verdugo Flood Control Project, the first project of the United States Army Corps of Engineers after passage of the Flood Control Act of 1936.

While steel Vierendeels were common for bridge construction, it was not unusual to find them made of concrete, which takes us back to this bridge in Vulcan. One can see clearly that the spans are Vierendeel using heel supports to ensure that the bridge maintains its stability. Originally the bridge was built as part of the project to introduce fast moving trains between Missouri and Texas. The structure is still being used by Union Pacific Railroad to this day. The question is who was behind the design of this bridge and what were his/her motives for using the Vierendeel?

This is one for the historians and pontists to find out. 😉 Happy Bridgehunting, folks.

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BHC Pic of the Week Nr. 158: Tribute to James Baughn

No photo description available.

This week’s Pic of the Week takes us to Kansas City and to this unique landmark, the ASB Bridge. While the city has many unique historic structures to choose from, this one stands out as being the bridge you must absolutely see when bridgehunting, period. The bridge was built in 1911 by a combination of Armour Packing CompanySwift & Company, and Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad. It’s a double-decker bridge featuring an upper deck used for highway traffic and a lower deck used for rail traffic. The most stunning is its vertical lift span of the lower deck, which lifts up towards the bottom of the upper deck. You can see how the span lifts in the video below:

This unique mechanism was part of the design introduced by engineer John Alexander Low Waddell in 1909 and is the only bridge of its kind that has it. While the upper deck has long since been removed with the replacement bridge having been built next to this span in 1986, the bridge is still being used for rail traffic. It is owned by BNSF Railways. The pic was taken during the Historic Bridge Weekend in 2011 where James and I (as well as other pontists) saw the bridge. While we never saw the lift span in action, we were treated to a train crossing the span. Unlike our trains in Germany, American trains are usually 5-10 kilometers long, and one has to wait just as many minutes as with the train’s length because most trains run at a maximum speed of 60 mph (100 mph). It was nevertheless a treat to see the structure in its awe and beauty. While I took many pictures of the bridge, this one was taken by Mr. Baughn, who created a detailed database of the bridge on his website shortly after our conference. You can find it here. In 1996, the remaining part of the ASB was designated by the American Society of Civil Engineers as a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark. It is elgible for the National Register and it is hoped that this bridge will be added in the near future. With many bridges disappearing in the Kansas City area, this bridge deserves to be kept in its rightful place and deserves to be a tourist attraction.

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No Comment Nr. 6

Photo by Alex Azabache on Pexels.com

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Here’s a stunning new video that was taken in Russia that presents a new reason for not crossing a fragile bridge with a truck that is double the weight that is allowed. As a bonus, it should never be done during a flood.

Talk about one boneheaded story! 😮🚚 I bet the driver who survived this mishap will be telling stories about this to his last breath on his last day on Earth. I hope he provides a lesson on the law of gravity and mother nature. 😉

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Note: Clip courtesy of NBC News, a subsidiary of NBC/Universal

BHC Newsflyer: 31 July, 2021

Photo by Artem Saranin on Pexels.com

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To listen to the podcast, click here.

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Headlines (with links included):

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Fire Destroys Covered Bridge in Aroostook County, Maine

Article: https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2021/07/21/covered-bridge-in-maine-destroyed-by-arson/

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Petersen Bridge
Petersen (Eden) Bridge. Photo taken by John Weeks III

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Historic Eden Bridge in Minnesota has a new home

Link: https://www.nujournal.com/opinion/2021/07/29/one-countys-junk/

Bridge Info: http://bridgehunter.com/mn/brown/2110/

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Bishop Bridge. Photo taken by Jodi Christman

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Bishop Bridge in Pennsylvania Closes- Future as a Pedestrian Bridge Open

Article: https://www.pennlive.com/news/2021/07/bridge-connecting-central-pa-counties-permanently-closes-after-123-years.html

Bridge Info: http://bridgehunter.com/pa/cumberland/217104061238090/

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Boris Johnson Halts Bridge Removal/In-Fill Project

Articles: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9841159/Bridge-block-victory-Boris-Johnson-intervenes-stop-dozens-Victorian-bridges-filled-in.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490

And: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9755183/Government-agency-burying-historic-bridges-concrete-right-country.html

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Rockslide Destroys Bridge in India, Kills 9

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=87qpcKFx2_I

https://www.independent.co.uk/tv/climate/india-rockslide-deadly-footage-v2f6720b2

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World’s First 3D Concrete Bridge in Venice

Link: https://newatlas.com/3d-printing/worlds-first-3d-printed-concrete-bridge-eth-zaha-hadid/

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Also:

  1. Headlines on other bridge news stories and
  2. The BHC will have its last podcast before summer vacation next week. After a four-week hiatus from its podcast, the next podcast will be in September.
  3. From August 1 until mid-September, all bridge articles will be found only here in the Chronicles website and not on its facebook pages
  4. The Memorial Bridgehunting Tour honoring the late James Baughn will be featured on the Chronicles facebook and instagram pages from now through the end of September. To participate in this tour and showcase your photos on the social media pages, click here for details and listen in the podcast for more details: https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2021/06/08/memorial-bridge-photo-tour-for-james-baughn/comment-page-1/#comment-18409

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The Walterdale Bridge — Snowbird of Paradise

Google Maps thinks this bridge is called the Walter Dale Bridge, but they are wrong. It is named after the nearby neighbourhood called Walterdale and it, in turn, is named after John Walter who was among the early settlers here. He operated a ferry across the North Saskatchewan River at this location. The original bridge, […]

The Walterdale Bridge — Snowbird of Paradise

The Interesting High Level Bridge — Snowbird of Paradise

Edmonton’s High Level Bridge takes traffic southbound on 109 Street. It is an unusual bridge because cars and small trucks use the lower level, not the top. The upper level is reserved for the Edmonton Radial Railway Society‘s historic streetcars. image via CTV News image via AAA.com One of these days, I want to take […]

The Interesting High Level Bridge — Snowbird of Paradise

1897: The Inauguration of a Bridge in Senegal — Transportation History

July 14, 1897 In West Africa, a road bridge in what is now the Republic of Senegal was officially opened. (At the time of the bridge’s debut, Senegal was a colonial territory of France.) This bridge, which was built across the Senegal River to connect the island and town of Saint-Louis with the mainland, replaced […]

1897: The Inauguration of a Bridge in Senegal — Transportation History