Newsflyer: 28 February, 2020

Cascade Bridge obli view
Cascade Bridge in Burlington, Iowa. Photo taken in 2013

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To listen to the podcast, click  here.

 

Headlines:

Public Opinion Survey on the Future of Cascade Bridge in Burlington, Iowa

Information on the bridge: http://bridgehunter.com/ia/des-moines/cascade/

         Public Opinion Survey (due March 1): https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/BQH3CXQ?fbclid=IwAR2Pmk63tx9deQHhqJiXSkrSzs1_R4ivQ6ZMivMilCjU4OsGu0zFI-STydA

         Facebook Page “Friends of the Cascade Bridge”:   https://www.facebook.com/groups/2084856478442260/

Bismarck Railroad Bridge in ND: Photo taken by John Marvig

Public Opinion Survey on Bismarck Railroad Bridge (closed)

  Information on the bridge: http://bridgehunter.com/nd/burleigh/bh44455/

        Information on the survey: https://www.regulations.gov/docketBrowser?rpp=25&po=0&dct=PS&D=USCG-2019-0882&refD=USCG-2019-0882-0001

 

Waterloo Bridge

Photo by Virginia Department of Transportation

Rehabilitation to begin on Waterloo Bridge in Virginia:

  Information on the bridge: http://bridgehunter.com/va/culpeper/5622/

        Information on the project: https://www.fauquiernow.com/fauquier_news/entry/fauquier-3.65-million-waterloo-bridge-restoration-project-begins-2020

Photo taken by Axel Mauruszat / CC BY 3.0 DE (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/de/deed.en)

Elsen Bridge in Berlin to be Replaced.

      Information on the bridge:  https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elsenbr%C3%BCcke

         Information on the Bridge Replacement Project:  https://www.tagesspiegel.de/berlin/totalschaden-ueber-der-spree-die-bruecke-mit-dem-25-meter-riss/25500656.html

         Information on the Highway B 96 (Documentary): https://www.zdf.de/dokumentation/zdfinfo-doku/traumstrasse-der-ddr-b96-von-zittau-nach-sassnitz-102.html

Photo taken by: thinking pixels mediendesign – André M. Hünseler / CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)

Rodenkirchen Suspension Bridge in Cologne to be Replaced:

Information on the bridge: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cologne_Rodenkirchen_Bridge

Information on the Replacement Plans: https://www.ksta.de/koeln/fussgaenger-koennten-alte-bruecke-nutzen-36335350

  Information on Motorway 4: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bundesautobahn_4

Photo by: ANKAWÜ / CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)

Kressbronn Railroad Bridge to be Dismantled and Transported to Scrap Pile after Failed Attempt to convert it into Museum/ Snack Shop

     Newsstory: https://www.suedkurier.de/region/bodenseekreis/bodenseekreis/Gemeinderat-spricht-sich-gegen-ein-Brueckenmuseum-an-der-Argen-aus-jetzt-wird-die-Bruecke-verschrottet;art410936,10454893

 

Katrine Aqueduct being Restored:

Information on the Project: https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/local-news/see-inside-historic-160-year-21573751

Information on the Aqueduct:  https://www.lochkatrine.com/loch-katrine-aqueduct/

 

 

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Changes to two Facebook Pages:

Article:  Click here

       The Bridges of Saxony:  https://www.facebook.com/brueckensachsens/

       The Historic Bridges of Iowa: https://www.facebook.com/historic.bridges.iowa/

 

Plus a memo on the Coronavirus, which has become a pandemic, and ways to handle it.

 

BHC 10 years

 

2019 Author’s Choice Awards: Mr. Smith Picks Out His Best Ones

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GLAUCHAU (SAXONY), GERMANY-

With 2019 and the second decade of the third millennium over and done, we’re now going to reflect on the key events in the area of historic bridges and feature some head-shakers, prayers, but also some Oohs and Aahs, jumps of joy and sometimes relief. Since 2011, I’ve presented the Author’s Choice Awards to some of the bridges and bridge stories that deserve at least some recognition from yours truly directly. Some of the bridges from this edition are also candidates in their respective categories for the Bridgehunter Awards.

So without further ado, let’s take a look at the winners of the Author’s Choice Awards in their respective categories starting with the unexpected finds:

 

Best Historic Bridge Find (International): 

2019 was the year of unique bridge finds around the globe, and it was very difficult to determine which bridge should receive the Author’s Choice Prize. Therefore the prize is being shared by two bridges- one in Germany in the state of Saxony and one in Great Britain in the city of Bristol.

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Rosenstein Bridge in Zwickau (Saxony), Germany:

Our first best historic bridge find takes us to the city of Zwickau and an unknown historic bridge that had been sitting abandoned for decades but was discovered in 2019. The Rosenstein Bridge spans a small creek between the suburb of Oberplanitz and the bypass that encircles Zwickau on the west side and connects Werdau with Schneeberg. The bridge is a stone arch design and is around 200 years old. It used to serve a key highway between the Vogtland area to the west and the Ore Mountains (Erzgebirge) to the south and east, transporting minerals and wood along the main road. It later served street traffic until its abandonment. The name Rosenstein comes from the rock that was used for the bridge. The rock changes the color to red and features its rose-shaped design. A perfect gift that is inexpensive but a keeper for your loved one.

Link for more on the bridge:  https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2019/03/28/what-to-do-with-a-hb-rosenstein-brucke-in-oberplanitz-zwickau/

 

Close-up of the bridge’s tubular railings. Photo taken by Nathan Holth

Brunel Swivel Bridge in Bristol, UK:

The other bridge that shares this honor is That Other Bridge. Located in Bristol, England, the Swivel Bridge is very hard to find, for the structure is underneath the Plimsol Bridge, both spanning the River Avon. While Bristol is well known for its chain suspension bridge, built over 150 years ago and spans the deep gorge of the Avon, the Swivel Bridge, a cast iron girder swing span,  is the oldest known bridge in the city and one of the oldest swing bridges remaining in the world, for it is 170 years old and one of the first built by I.K. Brunel- the suspension bridge was the last built by the same engineer before his death. Therefore, the Swivel Bridge is known as Brunel’s Other (Significant) Bridge.  The Swivel is currently being renovated.

Link on the Bridge and its Restoration Project:  https://www.brunelsotherbridge.org.uk/

 

 

Best Historic Bridge Find (US/Canada):

Fox Run “S” Bridge in New Concord, Ohio:

“S-Bridges” were one of the oldest bridge types built in the US, featuring multiple spans of stone or concrete arches that are put together in an S-shape. It was good for horse and buggy 200-years ago, especially as many existed along the National Road. They are however not suitable for today’s traffic, which is why there are only a handful left. The Fox Run Bridge in Ohio, as documented by Satolli Glassmeyer of History in Your Backyard, is one of the best examples of only a few of these S-bridges left in the country.

 

Royal Springs Bridge in Kentucky:

The runner-up in this category goes to the oldest and most forgotten bridge in Kentucky, the Royal Springs Bridge. While one may not pay attention to it because of its design, plus it carries a busy federal highway, one may forget the fact that it was built in 1789, which makes it the oldest bridge in the state. It was built when George Washington became president and three years before it even became a state.  That in itself puts it up with the likes of some of Europe’s finest bridges.

Link: https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2019/05/22/royal-springs-bridge-in-kentucky-the-oldest-the-most-forgotten-of-historic-bridges/

 

Biggest Bonehead Story:

We had just as many bonehead stories as bridge finds this year. But a couple of stories do indeed stand out for these awards. Especially on the international level for they are all but a travesty, to put it mildly.

 

International:

The Pont des Trous before its demolition of the arch spans. Jean-Pol Grandmont (Collection personnelle/Private collection). [CC BY (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5)%5D
Tournai Bridge in Belgium: 

Sometimes, bigger is better. Other times less means more. In the case of the senseless demolition of the Pont des Trours (Bridge of Tears) spanning the River Scheldt in Tournai, Belgium for the purpose of widening and deepening the river to allow for ships to sail to the River Sienne from the Atlantic, one has to question the economic impact of using the boat to get to Paris, let alone the cultural impact the demolition had on the historic old town. The bridge was built in 1290 and was the only bridge of its kind in the world. Its replacement span will resemble an McDonald’s M-shape pattern. In this case, less means more. Smaller ships or more trains to ship goods means better for the river (and its historic crossings) as well as the historic city. In short: Less means more.

Link: https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2019/08/17/pont-de-trous-the-bridge-of-tears/

 

Runner-up: Bockau Arch Bridge (Rechenhausbrücke) in Saxony.  

Residents wanted to save the bridge. There was even a group wanting to save the bridge. The politicians and in particular, the Saxony Ministry of Transportation and Commerce (LASUV) didn’t. While the 150-year old stone arch bridge over the Zwickau Mulde near Aue was the largest and oldest standing in western Saxony and was not in the way of its replacement- making it a candidate for a bike and pedestrian crossing, LASUV and the politicians saw it as an eyesore.  While those interested wanted to buy the bridge at 150,000 Euros. Dresden wanted 1.7 million Euros– something even my uncle from Texas, a millionaire himself, would find as a rip-off.  Supporters of the demolition are lucky that the bridge is not in Texas, for they would’ve faced a hefty legal battle that would’ve gone to the conservative-laden Supreme Court. The bridge would’ve been left as is. But it’s Saxony and many are scratching their heads as to why the demo against the will of the people- without even putting it to a referendum- happened in the first place. As a former member of the Friends of the Rechenhausbrücke, I’m still shaking my head and asking “Why?”

Link: https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2019/02/14/tearing-down-the-bockau-arch-bridge-lessons-learned-from-the-loss/

 

USA/Canada:

The “Truck-Eating” Bridge at Gregson Street before its raise to 12′-4″ in October 2019 Washuotaku [CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)%5D
Gregson Street Overpass in Durham, NC:

This story brings out the true meaning of “Half-ass”. The Gregon Street Overpass, which carries the Norfolk and Southern Railroad (NSR) is an 80-year old stringer bridge that has a rather unique characteristic: Its vertical clearance is 11 feet 8 inches (3.56 meters).  It’s notorious for ripping off truck trailers, driven by truck drivers who either didn’t see the restriction signs, traffic lights and other barriers or were unwilling to heed to the restrictions because of their dependency on their GPS device (Navi) or their simple ignorance.  In October 2019, NSR wanted to raise the bridge to 12 feet 4 inches (3.76 meters) to reduce the collisions. The standard height of underpasses since 1973 have been 14 feet (4.3 meters). End result: the collisions have NOT decreased.  Epic fail on all counts!

My suggestion to NSR and the NCDOT: If you don’t want your bridge to be a truck-eater, like with some other bridges that exist in the US, like in Davenport and Northhampton, make the area an at-grade crossing. You will do yourselves and the truck drivers a big favor.

Evidence of the Durham’s Truck Eater’s carnage: http://11foot8.com/

 

Northwood Truss Bridge in Grand Forks County, ND:

Not far behind the winner is this runner-up.  A truck driver carrying 42 tons of beans tries crossing a century-old pony truss bridge, which spans the Goose River and has a weight limit of three tons.  Guess what happens next and who got short-changed?   The bridge had been listed on the National Register because of its association with Fargo Bridge and Iron and it was the oldest extant in the county. Luckily the driver wasn’t hurt but it shows that he, like others, should really take a math course before going on the road again.

Links: https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/too-heavy-big-rig-collapses-100-year-old-bridge-north-n1032676

Bridge info and comments: http://bridgehunter.com/nd/grand-forks/18114330/

 

Spectacular Bridge Disaster (International):

Waiho Bridge near Franz Josef, NZ before its destruction. A new bridge mimicks this span. Walter Rumsby [CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D
Waiho Bridge Disaster and Rebuild in New Zealand

This one gets an award for not only a spectacular disaster that destroyed a multiple Bailey Truss- as filmed in its entirety- but also for the swiftest reply in rebuilding the bridge in order to reopen a key highway. Bailey trusses have known to be easily assembled, regardless of whether it’s for temporary purposes or permanent.  Cheers to the inventor of the truss as well as the New Zealand National Guard for putting the bridge back together in a hurry.

Link: https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2019/04/27/waiho-bridge-reopens/

 

Destruction of the Chania Bridge in Greece

No bridge is safe when it comes to flash flooding. Not even concrete arch bridges, as seen in this film on the century-old Chania Bridge in Greece. Flash floods undermined the bridge’s piers and subsequentially took out the multiple-span closed spandrel arch bridge in front of the eyes of onlookers. The photos of the destroyed bridge after the flooding was even more tragic. Good news is that the bridge is being rebuilt to match that of the original span destroyed. But it will never fully replace the original, period.

Link: https://greece.greekreporter.com/2019/03/02/heartbreaking-video-of-historic-greek-bridge-in-ruins/

 

Spectacular Bridge Disaster (US):

The Great Ice Jam/Flood 2019:

Sargent Bridge in Custer County, Nebraska: One of many victims of the Great Ice Jam/Flood 2019.

This category was a real toss-up, for the US went through a series of what is considered one of the biggest wrath of natural disasters on record. In particular, massive amounts of snowfall, combined with extreme temperatures resulted in massive flooding which devastated much of the Midwest during the first five months of the year. The hardest hit areas were in Nebraska, Iowa and large parts of Missouri. There, large chunks of ice took out even the strongest and youngest of bridges along major highways- the most viewed was the bridge near Spencer, Nebraska, where ice jams combined with flooding caused both the highway bridge as well as the dam nearby to collapse. The highway bridge was only three decades old. Even historic truss bridges, like the Sargent Bridge in Custer County were no match for the destruction caused by water and ice.  While the region has dried up, it will take months, if not years for communities and the infrastructure to rebuild to its normal form. Therefore this award goes out to the people affected in the region.

Link: https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2019/03/18/apocalyptic-floods-destroys-bridges-in-midwest/

 

Runner-up: Close-up footage of the destruction of the Brunswick Railroad Bridge.

Railroad officials watched helplessly, as floodwaters and fallen trees took out a major railroad bridge spanning the Grand River near Brunswick, Kansas. The railroad line is owned by Norfolk and Southern. The bridge was built in 1916 replacing a series of Whipple truss spans that were later shipped to Iowa for use on railroad lines and later roads. One of them still remains. The bridge has since been rebuilt; the line in use again.

Link: https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2019/10/08/brunswick-railroad-bridge-washes-away/

 

Best Example of Restored Historic Bridge:

 

International:

The Coalbrookdale Iron Bridge after restoration: Tk420 [CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)%5D
Coalbrookdale Bridge in the UK: 

The world’s first cast iron bridge got an extensive makeover in a two-year span, where the cast iron parts were repaired and conserved, new decking was put in and the entire bridge was painted red, which had been the original color when the bridge was completed in 1791. The jewel of Shropshire, England is back in business and looks just like new.

King Ludwig Railroad Bridge in Kempten, Germany:

The world’s lone double-decker truss bridge made of wood, received an extensive rehabilitation, where the spans were taken off its piers, the wooden parts repaired and/or replaced before being repainted, the piers were rebuilt and then the spans were put back on and encased with a wooden façade. A bit different than in its original form, the restored structure features LED lighting which shows the truss work through the façade at night.

 

 

US/Canada:

Longfellow Bridge: Lstrong2k [CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/1.0)%5D
Longfellow Bridge in Boston:

This multiple-span arch bridge with a draw bridge span underwent a five-year reconstruction project where every aspect of the bridge was restored to its former glory, including the steel arches, the 11 masonry piers, the abutments, the four tall towers at the main span and lastly the sculptures on the bridge. Even the trophy room underneath the bridge was rebuilt. All at a whopping cost of $306 million! It has already received numerous accolades including one on the national level. This one was worth the international recognition because of the hours of toil needed to make the structure new again.

Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longfellow_Bridge

Winona Bridge in Winona, MN:

The runner-up is a local favorite but one that sets an example of how truss bridge restoration can work. The Winona Bridge went through an eight-year project where a new span carrying westbound traffic was built. The cantilever truss span was then covered as it went through a makeover that featured new decking, sandblasting and repairing the trusses and lastly, painting it. To put the icing on the cake, new LED lighting was added. The bridge now serves eastbound traffic and may be worth considering as a playboy for other restorations of bridges of its kind, including the Black Hawk Bridge, located down the Mississippi.

Link:  http://bridgehunter.com/mn/winona/winona/

And with that, we wrap up the Author’s Choice Awards for 2019. Now comes the fun part, which is finding out which bridges deserve international honors in the eyes of the voters. Hence, the Bridgehunter’s Awards both in written form as well as in podcast. Stay tuned! 🙂

 

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Newsflyer: 28 July, 2019

Clarendon Bridge in Arkansas. Photo taken by C. Hanchey in 2012

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Author’s note: This is the first podcast since the move and features all the events that happened over the past 2-3 weeks. The most current version of Newsflyer (for the week of August 5th, 2019) will follow.

To listen to the podcast, click here.

 

Links to the News Stories:

Heat wave cripples Europe:

Summary of the heatwave

The Impact of the heatwave on the moveable bridges

 

Clarendon Cantilever Truss Bridge in Arkansas to be Demolished:

The end of the campaign to save the bridge after court ruling

Obituary of the bridge

Information on the bridge via bridgehunter.com

 

Trucker destroys historic bridge in North Dakota:

Summary of the incident

Information on the bridge via bridgehunter.com

 

Abandoned truss bridge in Arizona to be relocated to Tucson:

Information and story of the bridge

 

Historic Bridge in Lebanon County (PA) to get a lift to new home:

Article

Moving the bridge:

 

London Bridges Light Show:

Summary of the project

Videos:

 

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Historic Bridge in Washington State Available/ Catch: State Will Pay for the Costs. Any Takers?

Photo taken by K.A. Erickson in 2009 before it was replaced.

Washington DOT (WSDOT) will pay up to $1 million for the dismantling, transporting and reassembling of the 1925 through truss bridge to be reused for any purpose.

TACOMA, WS-  Sometimes historic bridges get into the way of progress and need to be replaced. This is especially true with bridges whose height, width and weight restrictions hamper the ability to get trucks and other means of transportation across.  However, before they are removed, states are required to put them up for sale so that third parties can claim them and relocate them the way they see fit. In general, the bridge program has had a mix of successes and failures in selling off their historic assets, for on the one hand, third parties wishing to purchase the historic bridge for use are shirked away by the cost for transportation and reassembly. Furthermore bridges marketed by the department of transportation are often too big or in the case of arch, beam and suspension bridges, too entrenched or too fragile to relocate. On the other hand, however, one will see in each state a success story of a historic bridge that was given to a third party. This is especially true with truss bridges as they are easily taken apart, transported to a new location in segments and reassembled. One will see an example in every state, yet Indiana, Texas, Iowa, Ohio and Minnesota have multiple examples of success stories. Even some stone arch bridges have been relocated to new sites where they still serve their purpose.

However, there is one state department of transportation that is going the extra mile to sell their historic bridge by even paying for the relocation and reassembly of the historic bridge. Between now and 2019, the Washington Department of Transportation (WSDOT) can sell you this historic through truss bridge:

According to the information by the WSDOT and bridgehunter.com, this historic bridge was built in 1925 and used to cross the Puyallup River at State Highway 167 (Meridan Street) in Puyallup, located seven miles east of Tacoma, until it was replaced in 2011 by a modern crossing. It was then relocated on land, where it has been waiting for its new owner ever since. Washington has got a wide array of historic bridges, whose unique design makes it appealing for tourists. They have the Tacoma Narrows Bridge (with its name Galloping Gertie), the , the world’s only concrete pony truss bridge,  and a housed through truss bridge made of wood in Whitman County that was once a railroad crossing, just to name a few.  The Puyallup Bridge is a riveted Turner through truss bridge, a hybrid Warren truss design that features subdivided chords and A-framed panels. After the demolition of the Liberty Memorial Bridge in Bismarck, ND in 2009, this bridge is the last of its kind and one of two of its design left in the world- the other is a Turner pony truss crossing in the German city of Chemnitz. Normally, going by the standard marketing policy, the historic bridge is marketed first before it is replaced and then taken down if no one wants it. However, looking at that tactic done by many state DOTs, this has not allowed much time for third parties to step forward and save it, especially because of the costs involved. For some bridges, like the Champ-Clark Truss Bridge, spanning the Mississippi River at the Missouri-Illinois border, there was almost no information about the bridge being up for sale as well as a very small time window of three months, thus providing no interest for at least one of the spans. According to MoDOT representatives in an interview with the Chronicles a couple months ago, the spans now belong to the same contractor building the replacement, who in turn will remove the spans when the new bridge opens in 2019.

The Pullayup Bridge is different because of its large size and rare design, which goes along with the history of its construction. It was built in 1925 by Maury Morton Caldwell, a bridge engineer who had established his mark for the Seattle-Tacoma area. This event was important for its completion came at the heels of the introduction of the US Highway System a year later. Born in Waynesboro, Virginia in 1875, Caldwell moved to the Seattle area in 1904. He worked as a civil engineer for the City of Tacoma from 1910 to 1916 before starting his own engineering business. Prior to the construction of this bridge in 1925, Caldwell had been responsible for the construction of the Carbon River Bridge in 1921, the Pasco-Kennewick Bridge in 1922 and the Wiskah River Drawbridge in Aberdeen in 1925.  Yet the 371-foot long Pullayup Bridge proved to be one of his masterpieces that he built in 1925, thus leaving an important mark on his legacy of bridge building in the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area. It is unknown how many other bridges were credited to his name, but from the historic research conducted by WSDOT, he was never a licensed professional engineer for Washington State and only practiced the profession for the Seattle-Tacoma area, which means the highly likelihood of more bridges having been designed by Caldwell and located strictly in north and western Washington and possibly British Columbia. He died in 1942, having been survived by his wife, Amy, whom he married in 1915, and his sister Nettle, who resided in Virginia state.

The Pullayup Bridge is being offered to those interested by WSDOT between now and 2019. The catch to this is the DOT will pay for the dismantling, relocation and reassembling costs- up to $1 million for the whole process. The only cost that the party may have to pay is for the abutments and possibly the road approaching it. The deal provided by WSDOT is a great steal for those wishing to have a unique historic bridge for reuse as a park or bike trail crossing. Even the thought of using it as a monument describing the history of the bridge, bridge engineering and M.M. Caldwell is realistic. Some parties who have called up wished to convert it into a house, similar to one of the reused spans of the now demolished eastern half of the San Fransisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, which had been built in 1936 and was replaced with a cable-stayed span in 2013.  The main slogan is if you have an idea for the bridge, WSDOT can pay for it, and you can make your dream a reality. With many successful projects, stemming from creating historic bridge parks in Iowa, Michigan and coming soon to Delaware (where historic bridges were imported from other regions) to numerous bridges along the bike trails throughout the US, Europe and elsewhere, this deal to have the bridge for free, with a transportation agency having to pay for the relocation and reerection at its new home, is something that one cannot really afford to miss out on.

If you are interested in this unique historic bridge, please contact Steve Fuchs at WSDOT, using this link, which will also provide you with more information on this structure. The agency is also looking for more information on M.M. Caldwell and other bridges that he may have designed and contributed to construction. If you know of other bridges built by this local engineer, please contact Craig Holstine, using the following contact details:  holstic@wsdot.wa.gov or by phone: 360-570-6639.

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Historic Bridge in Washington State Available/ Catch: State Will Pay for the Costs. Any Takers?

Photo taken by K.A. Erickson in 2009 before it was replaced.

Washington DOT (WSDOT) will pay up to $1 million for the dismantling, transporting and reassembling of the 1925 through truss bridge to be reused for any purpose.

 

TACOMA, WS-  Sometimes historic bridges get into the way of progress and need to be replaced. This is especially true with bridges whose height, width and weight restrictions hamper the ability to get trucks and other means of transportation across.  However, before they are removed, states are required to put them up for sale so that third parties can claim them and relocate them the way they see fit. In general, the bridge program has had a mix of successes and failures in selling off their historic assets, for on the one hand, third parties wishing to purchase the historic bridge for use are shirked away by the cost for transportation and reassembly. Furthermore bridges marketed by the department of transportation are often too big or in the case of arch, beam and suspension bridges, too entrenched or too fragile to relocate. On the other hand, however, one will see in each state a success story of a historic bridge that was given to a third party. This is especially true with truss bridges as they are easily taken apart, transported to a new location in segments and reassembled. One will see an example in every state, yet Indiana, Texas, Iowa, Ohio and Minnesota have multiple examples of success stories. Even some stone arch bridges have been relocated to new sites where they still serve their purpose.

 

However, there is one state department of transportation that is going the extra mile to sell their historic bridge by even paying for the relocation and reassembly of the historic bridge. Between now and 2019, the Washington Department of Transportation (WSDOT) can sell you this historic through truss bridge:

 

According to the information by the WSDOT and bridgehunter.com, this historic bridge was built in 1925 and used to cross the Puyallup River at State Highway 167 (Meridan Street) in Puyallup, located seven miles east of Tacoma, until it was replaced in 2011 by a modern crossing. It was then relocated on land, where it has been waiting for its new owner ever since. Washington has got a wide array of historic bridges, whose unique design makes it appealing for tourists. They have the Tacoma Narrows Bridge (with its name Galloping Gertie), the , the world’s only concrete pony truss bridge,  and a housed through truss bridge made of wood in Whitman County that was once a railroad crossing, just to name a few.  The Puyallup Bridge is a riveted Turner through truss bridge, a hybrid Warren truss design that features subdivided chords and A-framed panels. After the demolition of the Liberty Memorial Bridge in Bismarck, ND in 2009, this bridge is the last of its kind and one of two of its design left in the world- the other is a Turner pony truss crossing in the German city of Chemnitz. Normally, going by the standard marketing policy, the historic bridge is marketed first before it is replaced and then taken down if no one wants it. However, looking at that tactic done by many state DOTs, this has not allowed much time for third parties to step forward and save it, especially because of the costs involved. For some bridges, like the Champ-Clark Truss Bridge, spanning the Mississippi River at the Missouri-Illinois border, there was almost no information about the bridge being up for sale as well as a very small time window of three months, thus providing no interest for at least one of the spans. According to MoDOT representatives in an interview with the Chronicles a couple months ago, the spans now belong to the same contractor building the replacement, who in turn will remove the spans when the new bridge opens in 2019.

The Pullayup Bridge is different because of its large size and rare design, which goes along with the history of its construction. It was built in 1925 by Maury Morton Caldwell, a bridge engineer who had established his mark for the Seattle-Tacoma area. This event was important for its completion came at the heels of the introduction of the US Highway System a year later. Born in Waynesboro, Virginia in 1875, Caldwell moved to the Seattle area in 1904. He worked as a civil engineer for the City of Tacoma from 1910 to 1916 before starting his own engineering business. Prior to the construction of this bridge in 1925, Caldwell had been responsible for the construction of the Carbon River Bridge in 1921, the Pasco-Kennewick Bridge in 1922 and the Wiskah River Drawbridge in Aberdeen in 1925.  Yet the 371-foot long Pullayup Bridge proved to be one of his masterpieces that he built in 1925, thus leaving an important mark on his legacy of bridge building in the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area. It is unknown how many other bridges were credited to his name, but from the historic research conducted by WSDOT, he was never a licensed professional engineer for Washington State and only practiced the profession for the Seattle-Tacoma area, which means the highly likelihood of more bridges having been designed by Caldwell and located strictly in north and western Washington and possibly British Columbia. He died in 1942, having been survived by his wife, Amy, whom he married in 1915, and his sister Nettle, who resided in Virginia state.

The Pullayup Bridge is being offered to those interested by WSDOT between now and 2019. The catch to this is the DOT will pay for the dismantling, relocation and reassembling costs- up to $1 million for the whole process. The only cost that the party may have to pay is for the abutments and possibly the road approaching it. The deal provided by WSDOT is a great steal for those wishing to have a unique historic bridge for reuse as a park or bike trail crossing. Even the thought of using it as a monument describing the history of the bridge, bridge engineering and M.M. Caldwell is realistic. Some parties who have called up wished to convert it into a house, similar to one of the reused spans of the now demolished eastern half of the San Fransisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, which had been built in 1936 and was replaced with a cable-stayed span in 2013.  The main slogan is if you have an idea for the bridge, WSDOT can pay for it, and you can make your dream a reality. With many successful projects, stemming from creating historic bridge parks in Iowa, Michigan and coming soon to Delaware (where historic bridges were imported from other regions) to numerous bridges along the bike trails throughout the US, Europe and elsewhere, this deal to have the bridge for free, with a transportation agency having to pay for the relocation and reerection at its new home, is something that one cannot really afford to miss out on.

If you are interested in this unique historic bridge, please contact Steve Fuchs at WSDOT, using this link, which will also provide you with more information on this structure. The agency is also looking for more information on M.M. Caldwell and other bridges that he may have designed and contributed to construction. If you know of other bridges built by this local engineer, please contact Craig Holstine, using the following contact details:  holstic@wsdot.wa.gov or by phone: 360-570-6639.

 

Mystery Bridge Nr. 78: Turner Truss Bridge in Chemnitz, Germany

 

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In 1920, an American engineer, Claude Allen Porter Turner (CAP) designed two different bridge designs that were supposed to simplify the way bridges are constructed. The first was the Turner Flat Slab, a design where the decking portion of the concrete slab was strengthened, thus eliminating the need of extra piers and it would encourage the spans to be longer than usual. The second is a modified version of the Warren truss, where additional lateral beams are constructed midway through the A-portion of the truss, thus creating an A-frame for each panel. Both of these concepts were practiced on the Liberty Memorial Bridge in Bismarck, North Dakota. Constructed in 1922, the bridge featured three Turner through truss spans of 476 feet each, plus the Turner flat slab approach spans totalling 1105 feet- 625 for the west spans and 480 for the east side. It was the only known work for the engineer, whose career started at Gillette-Herzog Manufacturing in Minneapolis in 1900 but then started his own business after declining an offer to relocate to Chicago. The product of the American Bridge and  Foundation Bridge Companies remained in service until its replacement in 2008. It was believed to have been the only one of its kind built…..

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…..that is until this recently discovery in Chemnitz, Germany!

Located just two kilometers south of Chemnitz Central Railway Station along the Dresden-Hof-Nuremberg Magistrate at Bernhardstrasse, this pony truss span resembles the same Turner design as the Liberty, but with two unique differences: 1. The truss span is pony and 2. The endposts are vertical. Like the Liberty, the connections are riveted, even in the A-frames of the Warren. Yet some unique features of the truss include the curled cap at the top of the endpost. The end post itself has an I-shape. It is unknown what the length of the bridge is, but it is estimated to be between 60 and 70 meters long. The width is 10 meters between the trusses, the sidewalks on the outer edge is 2-3 meters, thus totaling the width of 16 meters. As the East German government built or imported truss bridges during its 40 years existence, whose designs were mainly Warren (and many modified versions of it) and had not much design to it, it is likely that this bridge was constructed during the 1920s, maybe the 1930s, and survived the bombings of Chemnitz during World War II. 90% of the city center was destroyed by 1945 and 70% of the houses and buildings, dating back to the 1800s were either in shambles or badly damaged. This bridge may have survived the bombing unscathed. Yet the lack of scars from the war might lead to a dispute over the bridge. It may have been rebuilt using replacement parts, but most likely in the late 1940s to encourage passage over the magistrate. If that was the case, then the bridge was built before the Soviets gained full control of its militarized zone, which became the German Democratic Republic (a.k.a. East Germany), while Chemnitz was renamed Karl-Marx-Stadt, a name that remained on the maps until German Reunification in 1990.

With this in mind, let’s look at the following questions to be solved regarding this bridge:

  1. When was this bridge built?
  2. Who designed the structure? Did this engineer use the Turner design or was it just simple coincidence?
  3. Lastly, if this bridge is considered a Turner truss, are there other designs of its caliber that exist? If so, where?

What do you know of this bridge, let alone the Turner truss? Share your thoughts either on facebook page or by using this contact form.  A tour guide on the bridges in Chemnitz is in the making and if there is enough information, this bridge will be added. Let’s see if we can solve this mystery surrounding this bridge, shall we?

Best of luck and looking forward to the findings. 🙂

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Mystery Bridge Nr. 78: Turner Truss Bridge in Chemnitz, Germany

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In 1920, an American engineer, Claude Allen Porter Turner (CAP) designed two different bridge designs that were supposed to simplify the way bridges are constructed. The first was the Turner Flat Slab, a design where the decking portion of the concrete slab was strengthened, thus eliminating the need of extra piers and it would encourage the spans to be longer than usual. The second is a modified version of the Warren truss, where additional lateral beams are constructed midway through the A-portion of the truss, thus creating an A-frame for each panel. Both of these concepts were practiced on the Liberty Memorial Bridge in Bismarck, North Dakota. Constructed in 1922, the bridge featured three Turner through truss spans of 476 feet each, plus the Turner flat slab approach spans totalling 1105 feet- 625 for the west spans and 480 for the east side. It was the only known work for the engineer, whose career started at Gillette-Herzog Manufacturing in Minneapolis in 1900 but then started his own business after declining an offer to relocate to Chicago. The product of the American Bridge and  Foundation Bridge Companies remained in service until its replacement in 2008. It was believed to have been the only one of its kind built…..

…..that is until this recently discovery in Chemnitz, Germany!

Located just two kilometers south of Chemnitz Central Railway Station along the Dresden-Hof-Nuremberg Magistrate at Bernhardstrasse, this pony truss span resembles the same Turner design as the Liberty, but with two unique differences: 1. The truss span is pony and 2. The endposts are vertical. Like the Liberty, the connections are riveted, even in the A-frames of the Warren. Yet some unique features of the truss include the curled cap at the top of the endpost. The end post itself has an I-shape. It is unknown what the length of the bridge is, but it is estimated to be between 60 and 70 meters long. The width is 10 meters between the trusses, the sidewalks on the outer edge is 2-3 meters, thus totaling the width of 16 meters. As the East German government built or imported truss bridges during its 40 years existence, whose designs were mainly Warren (and many modified versions of it) and had not much design to it, it is likely that this bridge was constructed during the 1920s, maybe the 1930s, and survived the bombings of Chemnitz during World War II. 90% of the city center was destroyed by 1945 and 70% of the houses and buildings, dating back to the 1800s were either in shambles or badly damaged. This bridge may have survived the bombing unscathed. Yet the lack of scars from the war might lead to a dispute over the bridge. It may have been rebuilt using replacement parts, but most likely in the late 1940s to encourage passage over the magistrate. If that was the case, then the bridge was built before the Soviets gained full control of its militarized zone, which became the German Democratic Republic (a.k.a. East Germany), while Chemnitz was renamed Karl-Marx-Stadt, a name that remained on the maps until German Reunification in 1990.

With this in mind, let’s look at the following questions to be solved regarding this bridge:

  1. When was this bridge built?
  2. Who designed the structure? Did this engineer use the Turner design or was it just simple coincidence?
  3. Lastly, if this bridge is considered a Turner truss, are there other designs of its caliber that exist? If so, where?

What do you know of this bridge, let alone the Turner truss? Share your thoughts either on facebook page or by using this contact form.  A tour guide on the bridges in Chemnitz is in the making and if there is enough information, this bridge will be added. Let’s see if we can solve this mystery surrounding this bridge, shall we?

Best of luck and looking forward to the findings. 🙂

 

 

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2014 Ammann Awards: The Author Chooses the Best Bridge Stories

Bentonsport Bridge spanning the Des Moines River in Van Buren County, Iowa. Photo taken in December 2014

To start off the Author’s Choice Award version of the 2014 Ammann Awards, presented by the Bridgehunter’s Chronicles, I would like to present you with an overture which is in connection with this year’s theme: Bigger is not always better. Enjoy!

 

This year’s Author’s Choice Awards features some of the most interesting stories of how people have come together to save their valued work. However, we have a story of a bridge found underneath a pub, as well as a failed attempt to salvage a historic bridge, and a disaster caused by gravity. And finally stupidity at its finest- caught on tape and youtubed! So without further ado, here are my pics for 2014:

Most Spectacular Disaster:

USA:

Ledbetter Bridge in Kentucky- Spanning the Tennessee River, this 1931 three-span polygonal Warren through truss bridge was one of the latter works of architectural art built by Polish engineer, Ralph Modjeski (1861-1940). The bridge no longer exists as it was removed last month, several weeks after a replacement span 700 feet downstream opened to traffic, but one cannot help but watch sections of the bridge collapse on its own, as seen in the photo gallery here.  After reporting one of the approach spans dropping by two feet in 24 hours, officials fenced off the entire bridge, only to later watch sections of it fall on the shoreline. Cause: Erosion undermining the piers, plus some vultures perching on the railings of the affected spans, as the photographer stated.

International: 

Cherryvale Bridge in New Brunswick, Canada- Covered bridges have been especially hardest hit this year, as fire, oversized trucks and natural disasters have damaged or destroyed over three dozen bridges in North America and elsewhere. The Cherryvale Bridge in the province of New Brunswick was one of those unfortunate victims, as floodwaters knocked the 1870s wooden structure off its foundations in May, and the structure flowed downstream before being smashed against a concrete bridge carrying a highway. More on this story hereAs beloved as they are, covered bridges are usually rebuilt by demand from residents. This is the case as well, but will it happen with this bridge? We’ll have to see….

 

Best Historic Bridge Find:

USA: 

Rocky Balboa Railroad Bridge in Durham, North Carolina- This railroad underpass, featuring a 100-year old deck plate girder span, may be a typical bridge accomodating rail traffic. But (and the music from Rocky Balboa will support this), it has had a record of annihilating semi trucks and trailers, as well as tractors, busses, and other overweight vehicles. This DESPITE having every form of warning system and sign in place. Here’s a video to prove it:

 

International:

The Parade Bridge in Norwood (South) Australia- Australia has a wide variety of metal, concrete and wooden bridges dating back to the early 1800s. This bridge, located underneath a pub, was found by chance by the owner as the venue was undergoing extensive renovations. Made of parapet and cobblestone and built in the 1850s, this bridge has a unique history, which can be found here.

Honorable mentioned: The Kersten Miles Bridge in Hamburg, Germany- Built in 1897 and named after the mayor of Hamburg during the Medieval times, this arch bridge is one of the darlings of Hamburg one needs to see, if one wants to know which of the 2,500+ bridges should be visited in the second largest city in Germany. Apart from its ornamental appearance and the fact that the bridge is made of brick, a recent discovery of a pflaster mosaic underneath one of the spans is another reason to visit this unique landmark. More on this discovery can be found here.

Best Way to Salvage a Historic Bridge: USA:

San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge East Span- The 1936 eastern half, consisting of cantilever truss spans, was replaced with a cable-stayed span with concrete girders last year and is still being dismantled even as we speak. Yet one person is looking at salvaging parts of the bridge for sustainable housing developments. Although it would look unusual to today’s housing standards, as seen in the article here, it would at least preserve the legacy of the eastern half of the bridge, which partially collapsed in the earthquake in 1989.

Also worth mentioning: Devil’s Elbow Bridge in Pukaski County, Missouri- The Freedom Prime Bridge and this bridge were two of the candidates considered for the author’s choice awards. Yet while Freedom received some accoldaes for best preservation example, this 1923 two-span Parker truss bridge got this one for two reasons: 1. The bridge was part of the Mother Road (Route 66) and because of the importance of the crossings along the highway that had once connected Chicago and Los Angeles, efforts are being undertaken to save what is left of this historic highway. 2. The bridge underwent an extensive renovation, which included new decking, sandblasting and repainting the trusses and making the bridge look just like it was when opened 91 years ago. The bridge should set an example for a pair of other crossings that have recently been rendered unsafe and whose futures are in doubt. More here

International: Katzenbuckel Bridge in Ebenhausen, Bavaria (Germany)- Spanning a rail line near Augsburg in Bavaria, this arch bridge was in the way of progress, for the German Railways want to expand the line and electrify it. The solution: Instead of razing the structure because of its historic significance, the plan is to raise the bridge to better accomodate traffic. Impressive but also one that will have other regions with similar bridges to consider this option, for there are enough candidates to go around. More on the plan can be found here.

Photo taken by James Baughn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Worst Example of Restoring/Using a Historic Bridge

USA:  Blue River US 40 Bridge in Kansas City, Missouri- Preservationists and locals are scratching their heads about this 1931 bridge, a steel through arch bridge that is the product of a pair of local bridge builders. The bridge was dismantled to make way for its replacement in August, but in a way that the parts were cut apart and left in a pile, waiting to be taken to its new home in Grandview. Photos of the bridge before and after its dismantling can be found here. Given the “logic” behind this process, the first and foremost question that comes to mind is: How are you going to put the structure back together again without altering its historic integrity? Or are you going to scrap it? My prediction: Its induction into Nathan Holth’s Wall of Shame.

International: Kramer Bridge in Erfurt, Germany- This bridge in the news but in a negative sense. The face of Thuringia’s capital was the focus of a drug operation, used in the German mystery series, Tatort (Scene of the Crime). The episode was aired in December and drew fire from viewers who deemed both the usage and the content to be inappropriate. Shortly after the release, two of the three actors resigned and the German channel MDR decided to scrap the Erfurt series. Lessons on how Tatort should be produced and how places of interest should be used without degrading it should be given by those who have been with the series for over 2 out of the four decades of its existence on German TV, including the likes of Ulike Folkerts, Axel Prahl and Jan Josef Lieffers, who play investigators for their cities (Ludwigshafen and Muenster, respectively.)

 

Biggest Bonehead Story We had a lot of candidates for this category, many of whom just could not learn to shorten the height of and/or lighten the weight of the load. The end result: covered bridges losing their tops and other bridges dropping to the ravine with their load on it. Yet only two examples really standout and should serve as a signal to truck drivers to NOT rely solely on GPS and assumptions, but to obey the traffic signs, or face liabiity.

Pollock’s Mill Bridge in Jefferson, Pennsylvania- Spanning Ten Mile Creek near Jefferson, this single span Whipple through truss bridge, built in 1878 by the Massilon Bridge Company in Ohio is one of the last remaining iron bridges in western Pennsylvania. Yet it almost became a hunk of twisted metal after a tanker truck tried crossing the structure, only to fall partially through the decking. To make matters worse, the driver dumped liquid contents into the stream to lighten the load and keep it from collapsing. A double-environmental catastrophe. Yet with two trucks following him, he should have known better than to first drive through the height restricted underpass located just a half mile before the bridge and then try crossing this bridge, right? Leadership prevents stupid things from happening. Fortunately, the bridge will be repaired and nothing was severely adversed in the water. However, as the article stated here, it could have been worse…..

Watford Bridge in North Dakota- Spanning the Little Missouri River at US Hwy. 85, this Warren through truss with V-laced portal bracings has dealt with a lot in the 55 years in service, especially as it is located near the Bakken Oil Fields. This includes oversized vehicles crossing it and damaging the overhead bracing. Sometimes stupidity is best shown on video, and the truck driver probably did not realized how much of an idiot he was for ignoring the height restrictions until watching the amateur video taken by another truck driver and his passenger, who  spiced it up with some commentary (Note- some comments may not be suitable for children under 13.)

 

This sums up my picks for 2014. As you can see, we had some interesting stories, all caught on photos and film in hopes that drivers pay attention to their load when using the bridges. Because even the most modern bridges can only take so much. Take this advice in mind: Less is Always More, regardless of the gas price.  After watching the videos and reading the articles pertaining to the bridge picks, have a look at the winners of the 2014 Ammann Awards coming up in the next article…..

 

Ammann Award Results for 2011

After many entries and votes for the best historic bridges and the people who have made a difference, the Historic Bridge Month has come to a close, but not before announcing the winners of the Othmar H. Ammann Awards for Excellence in the following categories:

Example of the work done on a bridge- rewelding the pin-connections. Photo taken by Nathan Holth, used with permission

Lifetime Legacy Award:
Vern Mesler: It is rare that there are people in the world who are experts in welding or any profession dealing with the steel industry. It is even rarer if a particular welder is also a bridgelover. But Vern Mesler, who has been in the welding business for over 30 years is one that has gone the extra mile to use his expertise to save historic bridges. He has not only offered courses in these two areas to those interested in taking up the profession of welding and historic bridge preservation, but he went further by creating a historic bridge park in Calhoun County, featuring his finished works of historic bridges that he put his expertise into use and preserved. All of his examples can be found in his newsletters the VJM Craftsman Newsletter. The author of the Chronicles has sent him some interview questions which he will send back to be posted.  Mr. Mesler can take pride in his work as he has not only won the Lifetime Legacy Award but also the Best Kept Secret Award for his historic bridge park in Michigan. The Bridgehunter‘s Chronicles would like to congratulate him for his work.
Honorably Mentioned:
Julie Bowers: Inspired by a local bowstring arch bridge in Poweshiek County (The McIntyre Bridge), Ms. Bowers put her marketing strategy and expertise in historic bridge preservation into use with the founding of Workin‘ Bridges, an organization devoted to consulting, marketing and doing estimates on historic bridges to be preserved for reuse. Already she has been successful with many bridges in Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, just to name a few. The Chronicles has done an interview with her via e-mail and will post the success story in the next posting.

Best Snapshot Award:

Photo taken by the winner: John Goold

High Level Arch Bridge in Akron (Ohio)- 32 votes: This oblique photo, taken by John Goold from the bottom of the structure shows a detailed look at the 1953 cantilever truss structure and the way it graces across the river and parking lot. This bridge should be considered a poster boy for all of these types that are coming down in vast numbers; especially in response to the I-35W Bridge collapse in August, 2007. This structure is not spared from this massive slaughter as it is slated for replacement as soon as the funding is approved (which could be either 2012 or 2013), unless attempts are made to rehabilitate it to prolong its functional life.
Link: http://www.bridgehunter.com/oh/summit/bh49749/

Honorably Mentioned:

Dotson Bridge. Photo taken by John Marvig

Dotson Bridge near Sanborn (Minnesota)- 29 votes: John Marvig had to fight through a half a mile of bushes, tall green grass and trees to discover and photograph this railroad bridge, a 1920s lattice through truss bridge that was once part of the Chicago and Northwestern railroad  route going from Sanborn to Sherburn and Fairmont, but was abandoned in the 1980s because of flood damage to the structure and the lack of service on the route. The bridge was named after a village that had once existed in the age of the Great Expansion (1870s) but all that is left of its memory is this piece of natural artwork. It is owned by the state department of natural resources but one has to get permission from nearby residents to get to the bridge.
Link with info:  http://pegnsean.net/~johnm/CNWCottonwoodRiverBridge.html
Other participants (with number of votes): Snowmobile Whipple Truss Bridge in northern New York state- taken by Marc Scotti (21); Riverside Bridge in Ozark (Missouri), taken by Daniel Shortt (13); Railroad/Pedestrian Bridge in New York state- taken by Marc Scotti (7); Sylvan Island Railroad Bridge-abandoned, in Rock Island (Illinois), taken by John Weeks III (6)

Note: The author would like to thank the students of the Departments of Civil Engineering, City Planning, and Building and Energy Technology at the University of Applied Science in Erfurt, Germany for voting on the historic bridge photos.

Best Kept Secret Award:

Charlotte Road Bridge at Historic Bridge Park. Photo taken by Nathan Holth, used by permission

Historic Bridge Park in Calhoun County (Michigan): This park, located not far from I-94 in south central Michigan, features a half-dozen vintage truss bridges, dating as far back as 1880; all of which were dismantled at their original sites, sandblasted, rewelded, and reassembled at their new location in the park.  This includes the Charlotte Highway Bridge, a 1886 Whipple through truss bridge, and the Bauer Road Bridge, a pin-connected Pratt through truss bridge with very ornamental and rare portal bracings. The mastermind behind the park is Vern Mesler as he has received many awards for his park and has inspired other groups to form parks similar to his. One of which was discovered in Iowa this past summer at F.W. Kent Park near Iowa City, which houses eight truss bridges. Mesler can add one more award to his collection with the Lifetime Legacy Award for his work.
Links:   http://historicbridges.org/truss/bauer/index.htm
http://historicbridges.org/truss/charlotte/index.htm
http://historicbridges.org/info/bridgepark/index.htm

Photo taken by the author in April 2011

Rendsburg High Bridge in Rendsburg (Germany): The first time that I crossed or even heard of this bridge was in May 2010 while on a train trip from Hamburg to Flensburg. Since that time information has been collected and it is sufficient enough to justify its prize on the international scale; especially given the fact that despite its rare design- a cantilever truss bridge with a transporter span over the Baltic-North Sea Canal combined with a loop approach supported by steel trestles and brick arch spans- and the fact that it was one of many bridges built in Germany by Friedrich Voss (this one was built in 1913), the bridge is under-recognized by the international bridge community. Even some pontists in the US had never heard about this bridge until it was presented at the Historic Bridge Conferences in Pittsburgh (2010) and St. Louis (2011).  Perhaps this recognition combined with an article to come in the Chronicles will help this bridge find its place on the international scale.
Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rendsburg_High_Bridge

 

In addition to that, the Bridgehunter’s Chronicles also has its own pics for historic bridges both in the US as well on the international scale that deserve to be recognized. Without further ado, here are the pics for 2011:

BRIDGEHUNTER CHRONICLES‘ BRIDGE PICS:
Best Example of Historic Bridge Reuse:
USA:
Full Throttle Saloon and Bridges in Sturgis (South Dakota): What was Michael Ballard thinking when he purchased a two-span through truss bridge (a Pennsylvania petit and a Pratt) and moved them to the world‘s largest and most popular motorcycle restaurant, bar and grandstand at Sturgis to be used as decoration and a grandstand for concerts? Well, nobody knows the answer to that question but Mr. Ballard himself. Yet maybe when he receives word of the award he is about to receive for his creativity in saving a historic bridge from becoming a pile of scrap metal and making it a popular tourist attraction, perhaps he will provide readers with a secret to his successful push to making his two bridges and his venue the place to visit while on a road trip through the country. The Bridgehunter‘s Chronicles has sent him a couple questions about this and as soon as an answer arrives, you will have an opportunity to read it for yourself.
Links:
http://www.bridgehunter.com/sd/meade/bh47904/
http://www.bridgehunter.com/sd/meade/bh47905/
http://www.fullthrottlesaloon.com/

International:

Photo taken by the author in December 2010

Krämerbrücke in Erfurt (Germany): The Kramer Bridge in the state capital of Thuringia in central Germany is perhaps the only bridge left in Europe whose arch design supports housing. The London Bridge was the other bridge, before its relocation to Lake Havasu City, Arizona in 1969. The bridge is part of the historic district considered a World Heritage Site and still houses small shops today ranging from local specialties to unique gifts for people to have. Further information on the bridge will come in a later column on the bridges in Erfurt. In the meantime….
Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krämerbrücke

Worst Example of Historic Bridge Reuse:

Oblique view of the Rock Island Bridge- Photo taken by John Weeks III, used with permission
Close-up of the swing span at the time of its demolition. Photo taken by John Weeks III, used with permission
The finished product- a pier using the last two spans of the Rock Island Bridge. Photo taken by the author in August, 2011

Rock Island Railroad Bridge at Inver Grove Heights (Minnesota)
This story is rather a tragic one for bridge lovers and locals interested in history. We have one of the most unique bridges in the country that spanned the Mississippi River bordering Dakota and Washington Counties south of St. Paul, built in 1894 by a bridge company in Pittsburgh. It was a double-decker bridge (with the lower deck carrying vehicular traffic and the upper deck carrying rail traffic) with seven Pratt truss spans, a Baltimore petit swing span and four Vierendeel truss spans (in the row from the Dakota side to the Washington side). It was closed to traffic in 1999 and was left abandoned until it was reduced down to a quarter of the entire structure in 2010- namely two Pratt spans on the Dakota side. It was then converted into a pier with welded trusses constructed as approach spans. In the eyes of many pontists and those knowing the bridge, while two spans were salvaged, the bridge is still considered a total loss, as cutting the spans up into blocks without finding other alternatives to using it for pedestrian use, combined with Washington County’s unwillingness to cooperate in the mitigation efforts resulted in a bridge altered to a point of no acknowledgement of its historic value.
Links: http://www.johnweeks.com/bridges/pages/ms02.html
http://www.bridgehunter.com/mn/washington/rock-island/

The Salvageable Mentioned:

The east spans of the Horn’s Ferry Bridge. Photo taken by the author in August 2011

Horn’s Ferry Bridge in Marion County (Iowa)
Located just below the Red Rock Dam over the Des Moines River 30 km south of Pella, the bridge was one of the longest vehicular bridges over the Des Moines River, let alone the state of Iowa. The bridge was built in 1882 and consisted of (from west to east) seven pony truss spans, one Camelback through truss span, one riveted Pratt through truss span and one riveted Warren pony truss span. While it was closed in 1982 when the new bridge, located upstream from the old one was open, it was open to pedestrians and cyclists for another 10 years until August 1992, when half the bridge fell into the river because one of the piers failed. After removing the wreckage and additional trusses, the remaining spans were salvaged and are now piers overlooking each other’s banks and adjacent campground. While the major superstructure, the first built over the Des Moines River in Marion County was a major loss, the county did an excellent job of saving what is left of the historic structure and is still a major attraction for tourists and campers.
Note: The author is looking for additional information and photos of the bridge before its collapse in 1992 for an article in the Chronicles as well as a book on Iowa’s truss bridges.
Links to photos: http://www.bridgehunter.com/ia/marion/bh49471/

The Worst Reason to Destroy a Bridge:
United States:
Fort Keogh Bridge near Miles City (Montana): This bridge is the rarest over the Yellowstone River as it consists of two Pennsylvania Petit through truss main spans and a pony truss approach span, built in 1902 by the Hewett Bridge Company in Minneapolis (the same builder responsible for the Salisbury Bridge in Minnesota). Yet floodwaters caused the pony truss bridge to partially collapse and one of the main spans to tilt by 10°. Natural solution: tear the whole structure down even though it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The bridge cannot be saved says the state historical society, yet one has to look at examples of bridges in similar shape like this that were dismantled (with bridge parts fixed) and reassembled, as is the case with the State Street Bridge in Saginaw County (Michigan) If the bridge still stands at the time of the awards, one should contact Nathan Holth, Vern Mesler and Julie Bowers for options and an estimate.
Links: http://www.bridgehunter.com/mt/custer/fort-keogh/
http://billingsgazette.com/news/state-and-regional/montana/article_0a0be72c-60a0-57ff-8605-9712b4c0df5d.html

http://www.historicbridges.org/truss/state/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dave_mcmt/5947278628/in/set-72157624985190546/  (Collection of photos of the Ft. Keogh Bridge after the flood damage)

Honorably Mentioned: Drayton Bridge in Oslo (North Dakota): This story was rather tragic. One wants to see the 1950s style Turner truss bridge with an unusual design (endposts not supported by piers), only to be denied the chance twice- once by inclimate weather and the second time because it was removed right after the spring floods in May. Todd Wilson of Bridgemapper once commented “Why are some of the unique bridges gone before one wants to see it?” Ask the Minnesota and North Dakota Departments of Transportation, as I do not have a clue either; especially as the bridge would have been a centerpiece for a bike trail for the people of Oslo and along the Red River…..
Link: http://www.bridgehunter.com/mn/kittson/6690/

International:
The Bridges in Saalfeld (Germany): On an international scale, here is a stupid reason for demolishing a bridge: because of the lack of money to maintain it. The southern Thuringian city of 25,000 inhabitants received this award because of the plan to remove not one, but EIGHT bridges! Even more insane is the fact that they are all pedestrian bridges built in the 1970s and 80s- two over the main highways going through the city and six along the two tributaries feeding the Saale River, the main river passing through the community. While this solution may be a short-term fix to save money, in the long term, it will create headaches for many pedestrians and cyclists for they will have to bike to the nearest vehicular bridge to cross and many of these structures are not suitable for this type of traffic. Smooth move on the part of the city government who plans on executing this plan beginning in 2012. Sad part is the fact that other cities are thinking that same idea, including Zittau, located on the Neisse River at the German-Polish border, which plans on removing two of its bridges beginning next year for similar reasons.
Link (German): http://www.otz.de/web/zgt/suche/detail/-/specific/Rueckbau-der-Bruecken-minderer-Qualitaet-in-Saalfeld-beschlossen-556950036
http://www.mdr.de/sachsen/neissebruecken100.html

The Best Find of a Historic Bridge:

Approaching the bridge from the south hill side. Photo taken by the author in August 2011

Spring Hill Bridge in Warren County (Iowa)
Iowa has a number of truss bridges that have been sitting out of use for many years, but manage to find its place in the nature. Some of them, like the Bellefont and Evelyn Bridges along the Des Moines River and the Hardin City Bridge near Steamboat Rock have been documented and are awaiting reuse for recreation purposes. Perhaps this 1909 Clinton Bridge and Iron Company Parker through truss structure should belong to the ranks of the “diamonds in the rough needing attention and recognition.” The structure was found by the author by accident coming back from the Historic Bridge Conference in St. Louis in August of this year. Even though the bridge has been closed for at least 10 years, it appears that the structure spanning the South River is in good shape and is being used for recreational purposes by local residents living up the hill from the structure. The only caveat to this bridge is accessing it, as the south approach has eroded to a point where the road ends a half a mile from the bridge. Access from the north end is possible, albeit it is privately owned.
Link: http://www.bridgehunter.com/ia/warren/334580/

Photo taken by the author in April 2011.

Kluvensiek Draw Bridge near Rendsburg (Germany): This is one of a few places that still exists along the Old Eider Canal, the predecessor to the Baltic-North Sea Canal which connects Kiel (the capital of Schleswig-Holstein) and Heide (where the North Sea is located). The drawbridge, built in 1850 by a company in Rendsburg, only received minimal attention through magazines and local newspaper articles. However, given the fact that the iron ornamental towers- which was part of a double-leaf bascule bridge which was in service for 40 years until the canal was decommissioned- is still intact despite the canal being partially filled in and can be seen from the nearby highway, the bridge is definitely worth a stop for a photo opportunity. (Please see link where the bridge is mentioned:http://thebridgehunter.areavoices.com/2011/07/28/touring-the-bridges-along-the-grand-canal-part-i/)

The Biggest Bonehead Story:
Thieves stealing an entire bridge in New Castle (Pennsylvania) for the price of metal:

With prices of metal flying sky high within the last five years and the economic conditions being unstable, one would actually show some restraint and not steal one’s personal belongings just to sell it for the price of a commodity, like scrap metal, right? Not with these thieves as a group of four people dismantled an entire 50 foot stringer bridge, sitting abandoned over a small creek, with blow torches, loaded them up onto trucks and took it to the steel yards for money. While they were eventually arrested for grand theft, the total loss for the bridge was over $100,000 and they set the precedent for others to follow, as reports of missing bridge parts were reported in Mississippi and at least six other states. Stupidity and desperation does have its rewards, but at the expense of others (including their lives), as this incredible act is on par with a story of an electrician’s attempts to steal copper from a live 200 volt transformer on an power line pole in Texas! I will not go into detail as to what happened there….. This story far outguns one’s attempts of crossing the Fryer’s Ford Bridge in Arkansas in May of this year- and dropping it into the river in the process- by over a mile and therefore receives the award outright.
Links:

Thieves Steal An Entire Metal Bridge in Pennsylvania
http://www.minyanville.com/dailyfeed/2011/10/10/thieves-steal-entire-bridge-for/
http://www.bridgehunter.com/story/1160/#Comments