BHC Pic of the Week Nr. 90

Despite being on lockdown, we took an opportunity to go for a walk to get some fresh air, one of the few exceptions we were allowed to do. Since Monday we were only allowed to go shopping, go to a doctor or get some fresh air by walking or running as long as one is alone, with only one friend or with your family. We are blessed to have a castle and a park and pond which were only a kilometer from our house. And on a gorgeous Monday, we trekked to Grundel Park and Pond to tank up some vitamin D and enjoy the great outdoors.

As a bonus, we took a photo of Grundel Park Bridge, which connects the pond with an island. The structure is about a century old but its original predecessor was built in honor of Glauchau’s engineer, Heinrich Carl Hedrich, who not only built some bridges in the area, but became the first person who built the city water system for homes and businesses. The construction of the Flutgraben Canal encircling Glauchau also was to his name. The island has a monument on the opposite end of the bridge and a statue, both built in his honor. More on him will come later.

And as for the pic itself, on a sunny day with trees set to blossom, there’s nothing really much to say except this:

Wow! ❤ 🙂

 

BHC Newsflyer: 21 February, 2020

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Millbrook Bridge in Illinois: Doomed

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To access the podcast, click onto this link: https://anchor.fm/jason-smith-bhc19/episodes/BHC-Newsflyer-21-February-2020-eb0bmf

Links:

Historic Millbrook Bridge to be torn down: https://www.kendallcountynow.com/2020/02/18/kendall-county-forest-preserve-commissioners-ok-millbrook-bridge-demolition-contract/a580lgd/

Five Bridges in Glauchau-Zwickau area to be reconstructed- detours planned:

Schlunzig Bridge

Closing of B-93 between Zwickau and Schneeberg

Historic Plaka Bridge restored: Link  here.

Theodor-Heuss-Bridge in Mainz Reopens but with restrictions: https://www.fnp.de/rhein-main-hessen/mainz-theodor-heuss-bruecke-reparatur-frueher-fertig-geplant-zr-13423755.html

Information on the bridge: Link here

The search for information on the Castlewood Bridge:  Link here.

BHC is collecting stories on Bizarre Encounters with People and Animals while bridgehunting/ photographing bridges:  Link  here

 

Important note:

There will be a pair of updates coming in the Chronicles Newsflyer regarding the Castlewood Bridge and another Thacher Truss span, the Okoboji Bridge, based on the most recent findings that occurred at the time if this podcast. Stay tuned. 🙂

 

BHC 10 years

 

 

 

Out with the Old and In with the New

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The Cable-Stayed Bridge (left) and the 1954 Communist-era concrete slab bridge (right) standing side-by-side. Come June of this year, there will only be one crossing the Zwickau Mulde. Photos taken in February 2020

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Communist-style old bridge to be torn down, road to be realigned to new span. Cable-stayed bridge to open to traffic by the end of May.

SCHLUNZIG/ GLAUCHAU/ ZWICKAU, GERMANY- Commuters driving between Glauchau and Zwickau will have one less route to take for the next quarter of the year. The Schlunzig Bridge, spanning the River Zwickau Mulde, along with the road connecting Schlunzig and the Volkswagen Company in Mosel will be closed down beginning Monday. The 1954 bridge will be torn down, while the road and the approaches will be realigned to the new cable-stayed bridge. The electrical and water mains will also be rerouted to the cable-stayed bridge prior to the old bridge’s removal.  According to the Chemnitz Free Press, the demolition and road realignment project is expected to last through May.

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Construction on the new bridge began in 2017 and it came in response to the inspection report on the (now) 66-year old bridge that revealed grave deficiencies that made rehabilitating the bridge impracticle. The bridge sustained severe damage in the 2013 floods resulting in the limitation of the speed limit to 30 km/h. Originally scheduled to open last spring, the construction on the cable-stayed bridge was slowed due to weather as well as the delay in the shipment of cables originating from Spain. The cables were spun and the stayed cables were completed in December.

The old bridge was built in response to the Great Flood of 1954, where 80% of the crossings along the Zwickau Mulde were destroyed. Its predecessor was one of them- a polygonal Warren through truss bridge with curved lattice strut and portal bracings, plus deck truss approach spans. It had originally carried a 6-gauge railroad connecting Mosel with Thum, located 3 km east of Schlunzig. The structure was a pre-fabricated concrete slab bridge whose piers had a semi-triangular shape, typical of Communist-era bridges built prior to 1989.

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During the time of the bridge’s demolition and the preparation for the opening of the cable-stayed bridge, commuters will have the choice of using the Motorway 4 to Meerane and then Highway B93 to Zwickau or the B175 from Glauchau to Mosel via Niederschindmaas before joining the B93 at the Volkswagen Company exit.

Come time of the grand opening of the Schlunzig Cable-Stayed Bridge at the end of May, weather permitting, the Zwickau Mulde will have another suspension bridge added to the list of bridges of its type. The river in known to have over a dozen suspension and cantilever bridges- both past and present between Zwickau and Wurzen, including the Paradiesbrücke, the suspension bridge at Rochsburg, two suspension bridges at Rochlitz, the cantilever pedestrian span at Lunzenau and the suspension bridge in Grimma. With the new cable-stayed bridge at Schlunzig, it will attract more tourists, photographers and bridge enthusiasts to not only the village itself, but also to the region Glauchau-Zwickau as well as the along the river. A big plus for the region.

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BHC Pic of the Week Nr. 79

Our first pic of the new year- let alone the new decade- takes us home. Home where one will find a historic bridge where you at least expect it. This was the case with this railroad bridge, the Schafteich Bridge. Spanning the River Zwickau Mulde, the bridge is located only two kilometers west of the train station in Glauchau. It serves the Dresden-Hof-Nuremberg Magristal Route and was one of the original structures that still serves traffic to this day, having been built in the 1860s and rehabilitated a couple of times in its lifetime. Speaking from experience (as you can see in the tour guide of Glauchau), the Schafteich Bridge is one of the most difficult to photograph, for the best photo can be taken from the north side, where the trucking firm is located, but only with a good camera and a good height over the fence. Yet when winter sets in and the leaves are all from the tree, one could sneak a shot from the southern side, where the textile factory is located. There one can photograph the structure either through the trees, like in this pic, or by climbing down towards the river. Because of the cold, I chose the first option and it made a world of difference.

 

Reminder: You still have time to vote for the 2019 Bridgehunter’s Awards. Deadline for voting is January 10th at 11:59pm, your local time. You can click here to go to the ballot. Reminder, there are two parts. The votes will then be tallied and the results will follow. The Author’s Choice Awards, where the author chooses his best and worst bridge stories is being put together and will be presented before the winners of the Bridgehunter’s Awards are announced on January 12th. Stay tuned.

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Mystery Bridge Nr. 121: Lorenzo’s Bridge?

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This is also this week’s Pic of the Week

The second mystery bridge takes us back to our backyard not far from our headquarters in Glauchau (Saxony), Germany. Approximately a kilometer away on the southern outskirts of town lies this bridge. It’s a closed spandrel arch bridge, approximately 20 meters long and 10 meters wide, enough to carry two lanes of traffic and sidewalks. It is located over Red Creek (Rothenbach), a tributary that starts at Rumpwald Forest, located 4 kilometers away and empties into the River Zwickau Mulde near the Glauchau Reservoir on the north side. It carries Wernsdorfer Strasse, a road that exits Glauchau and goes south towards Wernsdorf and Schlunzig. It’s easy to find as the road makes a steep dip as it does a double-curve going south, and one will cross it right after going past Rothenbacher Strasse.

This arch bridge was found by chance during a fall walk a couple weeks ago and together with another crossing about 300 meters away, they are the last two of their kind along the creek. While there are many houses on the opposite side of the creek, all of the bridges connecting the houses and the main road have been replaced with culverts and modern crossings. Another bridge was condemned recently and will most likely be torn down next year.

Still, this bridge is very mysterious because of its location within a neighborhood full of houses, many of which are well over a century old but they retain their historic architectural character. This pic was taken with one of these houses in the background.  There is no known information as to when the structure was built. Yet with a white streak of concrete above the arches, it appears the structure was rehabilitated 10-20 years ago, albeit it is unknown when exactly.

While many cities in the former East Germany had tens of thousands of “Plattenbau” highrise buildings, built by the Communist government between the 1950s and 1980s, Glauchau is one of a few cities whose houses have been left intact and not fallen victim to modernisation. It’s especially noticeable in the southern half as well as in and around the city center and Castle Complex. With historic buildings come historic bridges that are left as is or restored to their original glory. This bridge is one of those that is still in service despite its rehabilitation project.

But still, what do we know about it? Any ideas?

 

Author’s note: Lorenzo’s Bridge is a play-on-words from the film “Lorenzo’s Oil” starring Nick Nolte. Yet this bridge is located 200 meters west of Lorenz’s Bike Shop and another 300 meters east of a used bike shop along Rothernbacher Strasse.

Check out the bridge tour of Glauchau is you haven’t done so yet. You will find this bridge and more here.

 

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BHC Pic of the Week Nr. 68

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This pic of the week is, in a way, considered an update of sorts on one of the bridges located not far from the base in Glauchau. The Schlunzig Cable-Stayed Suspension, spanning the Zwickau Mulde River on the road going to the Volkswagen Company in Mosel, was supposed to be finished this year. But as you can see in this latest pic taken on October 2nd of this year, storm clouds seem to roll over to delay the construction even further. Yet unlike these storm clouds that brought about much-needed Fall weather to the state of Saxony (with rain and cold weather to douse the dog days of summer), the storm clouds are figurative and are hovering over the region as well as the state capital of Dresden. Normally, all of the stayed cables should have been installed and the approaches built. Yet as of present, only the second set is being installed with five more to go. The cause of the delay has been due to shipping issues and faulty cables, according to the Chemnitz Free Press. With October already here, officials in charge of the project are now predicting that the 7 million Euro project will be finished in the next year due to delays and the winter months coming ahead. This announcement is a slap in the face for the State Ministry and Transportation and Business (LASUV), which is in charge of all infrastructural projects. In a statement to the Free Press, officials there claimed that such a delay will hinder any finalization of projects slated to start in the new year due to financial issues.

With this delay, residents are growing frustrated and for a good reason. The original structure, a 1954 product from East Germany, suffered substantial damage due to the 2013 floods and cannot be rehabilitated. This was the reason behind this new, futuristic style bridge. Still, with this announcement, locals and commuters will have to settle for another winter at a snail’s pace over the old structure. For truckers, it’s another winter’s detour through Zwickau instead of using the hopeful shortcut through Stollberg and Mülsen and over the bridge. But then again, we have been accustomed to loraxizing the likes of Greta Thunberg and passing half-assed legislation anyway, so there’s nothing we can say to that.

We can only hope that come 2020, the new Schlunzig Bridge will be done so we can bid a much-needed farewell to a crossing that did a world of service and usher in a new era that will be the new face along the Zwickau Mulde but one that will benefit everyone and the environment. My two cents on this pic and politics.

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Hirschgrundbrücke in Glauchau- Update as of October 5, 2019

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Current status as of 5 October, 2019:

The roadway and concrete curb of the Hirschgrundbrücke is completed and is just a question of time before the approaches on both ends (the park side to the south and the castle side to the north) are constructed. With rainy weather we’ve been having, typical of fall weather here in Saxony, it would not be surprising if we have another delay and workers have to wait until they are added, together with the railings.

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Furthermore, the concrete facade, which youu can see in this pic sandwiched between the scaffolding and the concrete, is almost finished as well. The facade, as mentioned in a previous post, is broken up stone that had been on the original structure before it was demolished in July 2018. In this pic, the is about a meter’s worth of layering left before the bridge is like its previous form. And this will lead us to the following question:

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When will the scaffolding come down so that we can finally see the finished product? We know it will open to pedestrians in November, but we’re getting anxious to see her in use again. 🙂

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To be continued……

 

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