BHC Pic of the Week Nr. 92

Vessy Bridge

PW

Tying together bridges and the last entry on Robert Maillart in yesterday’s post, I’ve decided to move up the Pic of the Week by one day to show you another example of a work of art credited to the bridge engineer’s name. The Vessy Bridge spans the River Arve between the suburbs of Vessy and Veyrier in the southeastern portion of Geneva in Switzerland. The bridge is a deck arch span which features Maillart’s signature design, a three-hinged arch design. Construction started in 1936 and the 52 meter long structure was opened to traffic in 1937, three years before his passing.

These photos were taken in 2006, during my three month stay in Geneva. I did an internship for my Master’s studies at the World Health Organization during that time, and while I was there, I had an opportunity to photograph every bridge in the city, especially along the three rivers. This was one of them, which I photographed on a Saturday afternoon while on tour by bike. It was one of the rarest opportunities to get some shots from the middle of the river, like in picture below, for the Arve was at its lowest in terms of river levels. Despite having some vegetation in the foreground, one can get a closer look at the bridge and Malliart’s designs. Even more unique about this bridge are the vertical posts supporting the hinged arches as they are shaped like hour glasses. When I photographed the bridge in 2006, they still maintained a creme white color. Yet lately, they have been colorized with spraypaint and designs that are mostly deemed tasteless. You can find them in the photos taken by my colleague Nic Janberg via link here. In that link, you will find more literature pertaining to Maillart and his bridges.

Vessy Bridge

Vessy Bridge

Stay healthy and stay safe. Happy Bridgehunting! 🙂

BHC 10 years

BHC Pic of the Week Nr. 91

PW

Looks can be deceiving in this week’s Pic of the Week. This photo was taken in August 2011 and showed a car that wanted to cross this historic through truss bridge, only to be stopped by a Road Closed sign and a bunch of weeds. A tunnel view shot with some colorful reactions from the driver, which starts with …………

You finish the sentence.  😉

About the bridge itself, the Pratt through truss structure spanned the East Branch of the Des Moines River just off US Hwy. 169 north of the Humboldt-Kossuth County line. It was built in 1895 by the King Bridge Company of Cleveland, Ohio and was one of only a handful of bridges left in the state of Iowa that was built directly by Zenas King. His son George E. King established his bridge building company in Des Moines and was responsible for dozens more, many of them are still standing today.  Closed in 2010, the structure was removed during the Winter 2016/17.  More information and photos of the bridge can be found here.

 

BHC 10 years

BHC Pic of the Week Nr. 90

Despite being on lockdown, we took an opportunity to go for a walk to get some fresh air, one of the few exceptions we were allowed to do. Since Monday we were only allowed to go shopping, go to a doctor or get some fresh air by walking or running as long as one is alone, with only one friend or with your family. We are blessed to have a castle and a park and pond which were only a kilometer from our house. And on a gorgeous Monday, we trekked to Grundel Park and Pond to tank up some vitamin D and enjoy the great outdoors.

As a bonus, we took a photo of Grundel Park Bridge, which connects the pond with an island. The structure is about a century old but its original predecessor was built in honor of Glauchau’s engineer, Heinrich Carl Hedrich, who not only built some bridges in the area, but became the first person who built the city water system for homes and businesses. The construction of the Flutgraben Canal encircling Glauchau also was to his name. The island has a monument on the opposite end of the bridge and a statue, both built in his honor. More on him will come later.

And as for the pic itself, on a sunny day with trees set to blossom, there’s nothing really much to say except this:

Wow! ❤ 🙂

 

BHC Pic of the Week Nr. 89

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PW

This week’s Pic of the Week takes us back to Germany and to Saxony. This bridge was spotted by chance while traveling to Schneeberg from Zwickau, using one of the detours mentioned in an earlier article because of the main route being closed for bridge construction (click here for details).

This pedestrian bridge is located at the Schlossteich, at the foot of  the castle  located on the hills in Wildenfels. The community is located 10 kilometers south of Zwickau and five kilometers south of Reinsdorf. It’s a very unusual stone arch bridge not only because of the fact that it was built for pedestrians that can cross the structure as they go around the pond and up the hill to the castle. The arches are much different- the center arch has a vertical elliptical shape with the keystone touching the top of the bridge. The outer arches are elliptical horizontally.  The bridge is over two centuries old and must’ve been built around the time of the castle itself.  The strangest thing is that the bridge- and the pond itself- are located on the edge of a steep hill, where the water is kept back. A series of dams are located on the side of the bridge where the waters of Schönau Creek are regulated as they go down the hill enroute to the Zwickau Mulde River at Wiesenburg. In fact, a series of waterfalls behind the bridge and pond can be found and one can pinpoint how the creek is created and water is flowing downwards.

This photo was taken at the time of spring, where many crocusses and Schneeglöckchen (snowbell flowers) are located. As a bonus, here’s a close-up of a bunch taken next to the bridge with the pond in the background:

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Note: The answer to the last guessing quiz question in connection with Pic of the Week Nr. 88 can be found here. A commentator got this one right the instant the article was posted. Another guessing quiz is in the making and will come soon. 🙂

 

BHC 10 years

BHC Pic of the Week Nr. 88 (Guessing Quiz)

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PW

BHC FORUM

The 88th Pic of the Week takes us to Paris and to this viaduct, photographed in 1999. The viaduct is double-deckered, as seen in this picture taken from the bottom half with a tunnel view. There are people using the center aisle the outer lanes being used for cars and the like at that time.

The question is: Where in Paris is this located?  Post your comments here and on the Chronicles’ facebook page. The answer will come next week.

Good luck! 🙂

 

BHC 10 years

BHC Pic of the Week Nr. 87

PW

This week’s Pic of the Week takes us to Berlin and to this bridge: The Moltke Bridge. This red-colored stone arch bridge (made with Main sandstone) features three main spans over the River Spree, as seen in the picture above, and two outer arches that cross bike paths and sidewalks on each end. The bridge was built in 1891 and named after Field Marshal Helmuth von Moltke the Elder (1800–1891), chief of staff of the Prussian Army for thirty years. Moltke died just before the bridge’s completion and it was inaugurated by his funeral cortege. The bridge was one of only a few that survived World War II. The Nazis tried to detonate the structure in an attempt to stop the Soviet troops from advancing towards the Reichstag Building in the center of Berlin. Even though the detonation caused extensive damage to the bridge, it was not fully destroyed, and the Soviet troops crossed the bridge on April 28th, 1945. On May 1st, the Reichstag was captured and six days later, Germany capitulated to the allies.

The bridge was rebuilt to its original form and later rehabilitated to accommodate vehicular traffic, yet only cars and light-weight vehicles are allowed to use the crossing every day. Cyclists and pedestrians can also use the bridge, especially as there are many places of interest located between Berlin Central Station, the Reichstag Building, Brandenburg Gate and Alt-Moabit, one of the city’s suburbs.

This series of photos were taken in 2005, during the Open House on the grounds of the Regierungsgelände, where all of Germany’s parliamentary complex is located, including the Reichstag Building and Brandenburg Gate. The bridge was only 10 minutes’ walk from the open house, so I took a chance and photographed the structure. It appeared it had been rehabilitated at the time for the masonary red sandstones were cleaned and refurbished, there was new decking and the lighting appeared to be brand new. While the stone arches with all of the gargoyles and inscriptions were impressive, the ornamental lighting and railings were the ones that make the structure stand out the most. One could photograph them for hours, from different angles and using different experiments. Many of them survived the war and the subsequent division of Berlin that would occur until the Fall of the Wall. Judging by their texture, it appeared that they too were restored after 1990. Nevertheless, while the design and material used were impressive, this one has the “aha-“ effect for they are the first things one will see when crossing the bridge. They are also a rare breed for many modern bridges nowadays don’t feature the ornaments for they are too expensive and time-consuming. Yet sometimes a little decoration does make a bridge more attractive instead of bland.

Enjoy this series of bridge pics but keep this in mind:  One wonders what the bridge looks like when photographed at night. This one is worth a shot and if so, one can capture the structure and its glowing lanterns in all of its glory. For those wanting to try it, it’s worth a shot, in my (humble) opinion.

More information, photos and data can be accessed here.

bhc 10th anniversary logo alt

 

BHC Pic of the Week Nr. 86

PW

 

This week’s Pic of the Week takes us to Iowa and to this bridge. The Thunder Bridge is one of two Pennsylvania through truss bridges that span the Little Sioux River in Spencer, Iowa. The bridge is the shorter of the two and also the younger, having a length of 164 feet and been built in 1905. Yet the two were built by the same company, the Clinton Bridge and Iron Works Company. They also have other commonality: the sound of rattling wooden planks when crossing it. In the car or even taken from an oblique angle like in this picture taken in 2011, one will hear it clearly. A video taken by another avid bridge fan and fisherman below will show you the sound taken from the car.

 

Currently the bridge is still open and if you want to get some photos, you can park at the nearby boat access next to the bridge. It’s highly unlikely that the bridge will close to traffic because only a few cars cross it daily. Furthermore, the street which the bridge carries makes a loop and ends a quarter mile to the west at the same highway, which makes truck deliveries easier. If anything, since Clay County has a few very unique but important artefacts, that Thunder will at the very most receive new wooden flooring in addition to the repairs of beams and the like, making it one of the classic examples of in-kind restoration, and one where the wheels will keep on rattling, just like in the pic with the US-Postal Service truck. A real treat if you visit Iowa and happen to pass by this place.

To see more of Iowa’s historic bridges, please visit the facebook website and like to follow. The link is available here.

 

BHC 10 years