HB in Polk County, Arkansas For Sale: Any Takers?

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MENA, ARKANSAS- Polk County, Arkansas has a historic bridge for sale. Built in 1915, the structure has a riveted steel Pratt pony truss design, with timber stringers and a  wooden deck. The parameters of the bridge is 72 feet long and 11.67 feet wide between the trusses. It has been closed for several years, but the structure can be found on Polk County Road 50 near Old Sale Barn in Potter.  Takers of the bridge must take it as is, and it must be removed and transported by licensed contractor with commercial general liability insurance. This is part of the plan to remove the truss bridge and replace it with a new structure. How the truss bridge is repurposed is dependent on the new owner.


Sealed bids will be accepted prior to the auction at 9AM on November 25, 2019 in the basement of the Polk County Courthouse. The courthouse is located at 507 Church AVE, Mena, AR 71953. Bids should be delivered in a sealed envelope and clearly marked “Polk County Road 50 bridge”. The bidder with the acceptable amount will retain responsibilities for the truss bridge, including relocation, restoration and repurposing. Funding may be available to offset the costs.  Inquiries should be made to Polk County Judge, Brandon Ellison at 479-394-8133.

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Mystery Bridge Nr. 118: Wichert Truss Viaduct Serving Industrial Trains

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This Mystery Bridge is in connection with last week’s photo of the week. It is a unique find and one that will come up fast when approaching the city of Mittweida, located 15 kilometers north-northeast of Chemnitz. The city of 15,000 inhabitants is home to the college of applied sciences and has a unique historic setting, which straddles the valley of the River Zschopau and its tributaries.

This bridge is located at the junction of Burgstädter Strasse and Stadtring, which heads north towards the college. It’s a three span railroad viaduct that features a combination Pratt and Wichert Truss designs supported on steel, A-shaped piers. The total length is approximately 100 meters. The Wichert truss was designed by E.M. Wichert in Pittsburgh in 1930 and is characterized by its deck arch design with a diamond-shaped panel above each pier. The curved lower chord gives the bridge the form of an arch, but it does not rely on arch action to carry the load, according to sources. Wichert trusses were experimented with numerous deck-truss-arch bridges in and around Pittsburgh, and many of them still exist today. The most common Wichert truss bridge is the Homestead Grays Bridge near Pittsburgh. The 3,100-foot long bridge was built in 1936 and was last rehabilitated in 2006. Other Wichert truss spans can be found in Maryland and West Virginia.

Yet the viaduct in Mittweida had the characteristics of the Wichert truss design in it, which leads to the question of how Wichert developed and patented the truss design. Was it based on his observations of the previous designs, directly or indirectly? There is little known information written about Wichert, except the fact that his family name is predominantly German, meaning he may have emigrated from Germany to the US during one point in his life to start his career in Civil Engineering, just like the bridge builders before him, such as Albert Fink, Gustav Lindenthal, John Roebling, and Fritz Leonhardt. Finding out more about Wichert would open the doors to find out about his life and career. It would also help answer the question of the origin of his patented truss span.

As far as the bridge itself is concerned, the structure was built between 1906 and 1907 as part of the project to build a railroad line connecting Mittweida and Dreiwerden, located 12 km to the southeast. The line was built to allow trains to carry goods to the paper factory in Dreiwerden. The northern branch connecting Mittweida and Ringenthal was built at the same time to transport raw materials to the power plant. That line was dismantled after 1974. As for the southern branch where this viaduct is located, train service continued until its abandonment in 1997. The line has since been partially dismantled, but the bridge still stands today. It is unknown who built the bridge during that time, but the line was built under the auspisces of the Saxony Railroad Company (Sächsische Eisenbahngesellschaft GmbH) and financed by the Kingdom of Saxony during that time.

To summarize the points on this mystery bridge:

  1. The bridge was built between 1906 and 1907, serving the Mittweida-Dreiwerden southern branch, connecting the main train station with the paper factory.
  2. The bridge features one of the earliest of the Wichert truss designs even though it was patented in 1930.
  3. Little is known about E.M. Wichert, the inventor of the truss design, except that he may have been one of the German-immigrants that started his career in the States as a bridge builder and engineer.

Now it’s your turn to provide some information about this bridge and the inventor of the Wichert truss. If you have some useful information for either the bridge or the engineer, feel free to contact the Chronicles, using the channels available. The information will be updated as it comes in. A biography of E.M. Wichert will be included in the Chronicles under the category Bridge Builders Directory. Wishing you happy hunting and many thanks for your help.

Till we meet again. 🙂

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BHC Pic of the Week Nr. 53

This week’s Pic of the Week takes us back to 2011 and the state of Iowa. This time to Spencer, where one of two Pennsylvania through trusses still exist. The Dump Road Bridge (also known as Old Rusty) spans the Little Sioux River at 18th Avenue west of the city. Built by the Clinton Bridge and Iron Works Company in 1901, Old Rusty was brought here in 1915 after having served Main Street crossing the same river along with another through truss span for 14 years. That crossing was replaced with a multiple-span arch bridge which was replaced by the current structure in 2008. Old Rusty still serves traffic but as a light-weight three ton crossing. Fitting to its location as very few cars cross the bridge. However, due to its age, one has to start considering its prospects as a bike/pedestrian crossing in the long-run.

Newsflyer 1 April, 2019

Kern Bridge in Mankato. Photo taken by James Baughn

Podcast can be found here.

 

Click on the highlighted links below to read more.

FB Page to save Kern Bridge in Mankato launched. Link: here

FB Page on Iowa’s Historic Bridges to be launched, replacing the Green Bridge page. Link: here

FB Page on Saxony’s Historic Bridges to be launched, replacing the Bockau Arch Bridge page. Link: here

Watts Mill Bridge being restored.

Freeway Bridge Collapses in Tennessee

Arch Bridge in Scotland a Death Trap for Dogs

Flensburg Files’ survey on Automatic Donors after Death.

 

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Newsflyer: 18 March, 2019

Carns State Aid in Rock County, Nebraska: Damaged by Flash Flooding  Photo: wikiCommons

Link to the podcast can be found here: https://soundcloud.com/jason-smith-966247957/bhc-newsflyer-18-march-2019

 

Links to the article for more details:

Key US/Canadian Crossing at Baudette to be Replaced

Historic Hayden Bridge in Oregon reopens to pedestrians

Another historic bridge in Flöha (Saxony) to be replaced

High winds blow train off high trestle in New Mexico

Floods claim the first victim in Iowa- Trolley Bridge

A summary of the bridges destroyed by historic flooding here

Trucker loses his goods in an accident off a bridge in Hesse

The future of a long abandoned historic railroad bridge west of Flensburg hangs in the balance

Key historic bridge in Lubeck causing headaches for travelers

A third viaduct in Chemnitz is getting a facelift

Chronicles says good-bye to Google+

And a quick update on the historic bridge on the island of Crete that was washed away due to flooding.

ALSO: The Bridgehunter’s Chronicles is looking into the suspicious loss of subscribers on its regular wordpress page. On Saturday the 16th, the number of subscribers went from 901 to 201 for unknown reasons. It is possible that subscribers may not be getting their articles on a regular basis. If you are one of them, please resubscribe via E-Mail or follow the Chronicles on the social network platforms. We would like to make sure everyone is connected and are getting the Posts and the like on a regular Basis. The Slogan is “No Reader/Subscriber left behind.” For those who are interested in following the Chronicles, please spread the word and encourage others to join.

 

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Newsflyer: 25 February, 2019

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Alberthafen Brücke in Dresden: Currently under the knife for rehabilitation. Photo taken in February 2019

The podcast of the Newsflyer can be listened to by clicking on this link: https://soundcloud.com/jason-smith-966247957/bhc-newsflyer-25-february-2019

 

Headlines:

Alberthafen Brücke in Dresden to be rehabilitated. Project completion in 2020.

Rabenstein Viaduct in Chemnitz has enough funding for its own rehabilitation. Question: when?

Mühlheim Suspension Bridge in Cologne to get a facelift

Group to save the historic Jenkins Bridge in Missouri formed

Future of the Green Bridge facebook website after bridge was restored and reopened

Historic bridge at train station a subject of satire and debate over its future.

 

Click on the headlines to read more. Three of the articles are in German but an English-speaking article will come in the Chronicles.

 

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