Work Begins on the Tower Bridge in California

Work Begins on the Tower Bridge in California

Transportation History

July 20, 1934

In California, construction began on a new bridge that would cross the Sacramento River and connect the state capital of Sacramento in Sacramento County with the city of West Sacramento in Yolo County. This vertical lift bridge was built to replace the M Street Bridge, which was owned by the Sacramento Northern Railway. (A vertical lift bridge is a type of movable bridge designed for areas through which large ships travel on a regular basis; this bridge’s span can be elevated vertically while remaining parallel with the structure’s deck.)

“Formal legal technicalities dealing with posting of bonds and signing of contracts with the Sacramento Northern railroad will not be completed for a couple of days,” reported the July 20 edition of the Woodland Daily Democrat newspaper. “However, construction buildings were set up on the job today, including the office and tool house.”

The M Street Bridge was a…

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The Opening of the Present-Day Arrigoni Bridge in Connecticut

The Opening of the Present-Day Arrigoni Bridge in Connecticut

Transportation History

On August 6, 1938, a newly constructed steel through arch bridge was formally opened in Middlesex County in south-central Connecticut. This structure, spanning the Connecticut River and connecting the city of Middletown with the town of Portland, took the place of a drawbridge that had been opened in 1896. The building of a replacement bridge began in 1936. Charles J. Arrigoni, who served in the Connecticut House of Representatives from 1933 to 1936 and the Connecticut State Senate between 1937 and 1940, was a staunch champion of this construction project. Originally called the Middletown-Portland Bridge, the structure was eventually renamed the Arrigoni Bridge.

The bridge was opened with considerable fanfare despite inclement weather throughout that Saturday afternoon. The festivities included a huge parade that made its way across the new structure. The Hartford Courant reported, “Along the sidewalks of the Main streets in Middletown and Portland, filling every available space…

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