The Victoria Bridge in Canada Makes Its Formal Debut 

The Victoria Bridge in Canada Makes Its Formal Debut 

Transportation History

August 25, 1860

The Victoria Bridge in Canada was dedicated. This bridge, which spans the St. Lawrence River and connects Montreal with the south shore city of Saint-Lambert, was officially opened about eight months after the first trains had passed over the new structure.

The Victoria Bridge in 1901

The Victoria Bridge was the first bridge over the St. Lawrence River. At the time of its completion, it was also the longest bridge in the world. This structure, now carrying both rail and motor vehicle traffic, has played a pivotal role in establishing Montreal as a major hub in North America’s railroad system.

The bridge was named in honor of Queen Victoria. While declining to attend the dedication ceremony, she did send her oldest son Albert Edward – the Prince of Wales and heir to the British throne – to represent her. “There was no delay in the performance of…

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The Debut of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge in Maryland

The Debut of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge in Maryland

Transportation History

July 30, 1952

The Chesapeake Bay Bridge, which connects the Eastern Shore of Maryland with the state’s Western Shore, was opened to traffic. At the time of its debut, this bridge — with the original span measuring 4.3 miles (6.9 kilometers) in length from shore to shore — was the world’s longest continuous steel structure entirely over water. The Chesapeake Bay Bridge also began its existence as the third longest bridge overall.

Thousands of people were on hand for the grand opening of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge, and those festivities included  airplanes flying overhead as a salute; the unveiling of a plaque in honor of those involved in the construction project; various marching bands; and songs performed by the Baltimore and Ohio Glee Club. There were also speeches given by a half-dozen dignitaries in attendance.  The Annapolis Capital newspaper reported, “The new bridge and the men who had a part in…

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