5 unusual endings for London’s Thames bridges

5 unusual endings for London’s Thames bridges

Heritage Calling

Many of the bridges that cross the Thames today are not the first structures to have spanned their sites.

There has been a crossing at the site of London Bridge almost as long as there has been a city of London; Saxon crossings, Roman crossings, the fabled medieval crossing of 1209 brimming with buildings, pubs and shops. There have also been two Waterloo Bridges (the first was opened in 1817 and the second in 1942), two Southwark Bridges (the first was opened in 1819 and the second in 1921) and two Westminster Bridges (the first opened in 1750 and the second in 1862). But what becomes of old bridges after they are demolished?

Here are five stories of unusual endings.

1. A chair made from Old London Bridge

A chair made from old London Bridge A chair made from Old London Bridge © Carine Hawkins

This chair is made from the timbers of Old London Bridge (opened in…

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