San Antonio River Walk Tour and Bridges

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Hays Street Bridge in San Antonio. Photo taken in 2015 by Royce and Bobette Haley

San Antonio, Texas- one of the most unique cities in the state. With a population of 1.5 million inhabitants, the city, which was founded by the Spanish over 200 years ago, is rich in its history and cultural heritage. It is home of the Alamo, the site of the battle for Texas where all of the rangers who fought the troops under Santa Ana lost their lives, triggering the famous cry by Sam Houston, which won the war against the Mexicans. It is home of the San Antonio Spurs basketball team with its storied history of championships in the NBA. And it is home of the famous River Walk and its numerous bridges along the route.

While San Antonio has as many bridges as Pittsburgh, the majority of the city’s historic bridges are located along the River Walk. The idea of the River Walk dates back to a tragedy that took many lives more than 90 years ago. In 1921, flooding along the river devastated much of San Antonio, killing 90 people. It was when city planners undertook a massive effort to create a series of dams and diversion canals, designed to reroute the river around the city. While work commenced on the Olmos Dam and diversion canals in 1926, the conservation society stopped a proposal to construct a pavement sewer canal, thus leading to one local architect who conceived an idea which became the face of today’s city center.

Robert Hugman (1902-1980) submitted his plan for the canal and riverwalk project in 1929. Despite opposition to the plan, Hugman received backing from mayor Jack White, who in 1938 passed a bond that resulted in the beautification of the city center along the river. There, 4 kilometers of canals, walkways and many bridges were constructed as part of the Works Progress Administration, resulting in the increase of commerce and tourism. Many bridges crossing the River Walk today date back to the late 1930s.

This takes us to a pair of videos that will show you the River Walk area according to boat tour. While the Hays Street Bridge is not among those crossing the river, there are some others that are as old as the 1887 structure but were brought to the River Walk area.

Can you find out how many bridges cross the River Walk area? And if so, which types of bridges and from which eras did they come from. Click onto the data file from bridgehunter.com (here) and compare. You will be amazed at the number of (many historic) bridges that you can see while touring by boat.

Good luck! 🙂

Video:

 

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