Wordless Wednesday: Bridges of Cambridge

Wordless Wednesday: Bridges of Cambridge

Here’s another guest column in Connection with a tour of bridges in Great Britain. This time it’s the bridges of Cambridge. There are just as many reasons to visit this old and beautiful City as there is for reblogging this. Have a look at the photos and some comments from Janaline’s World Journey. Enjoy! 🙂

Janaline's world journey

Bridges of CambridgeBridges of Cambridge

Published as part of Wordless Wednesday.

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Bridge Trip! 17 Historic Iowa Bridges We’ve Discovered

Bridge Trip! 17 Historic Iowa Bridges We’ve Discovered

Growing up just North of the border, I can testify to the fact that Iowa has a large number and wide Array of historic bridges, whose history Dates back to the 1860s and whose Engineering Technology contributed to the way Transportation and infrastructure in the US has developed to this day. Here’s an account of one Family, who did a cross-country tour of the Hawkeye state and saw the cremé de la creme of bridges going from North to south. I hope you enjoy it and can use this as part of your vacation plan to visit the Midwest. Iowa does make a Person smile. 🙂

The Iowa Gallivant

We have traveled all over the great state of Iowa and we’ve noticed a trend. We have stumbled upon some outstanding bridges! From monstrous interstate high traffic achievements to small historical rural bridges that seem to be found in the most random places you can think of. Every road trip could use a bridge or two. (Click the links below the pictures to see the original blog post these bridges are featured in)

IMG_0981 One of our most enjoyable time on the Mississippi River was June in Lansing, Iowa. 

In the town park of Fertile, Iowa is one of the most picturesque scenes anywhere on the Winnebago River.

IMG_0766 Our latest trip to Spencer had this beautiful bridge welcoming us in to town and will see thousands of bikes during RAGBRAI this year!

IMG_0426 We made the trip to Charles City for our annual Scouting RAGBRAI series and enjoyed their iconic cable…

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Bridge Trip! 17 Historic Iowa Bridges We’ve Discovered

Growing up just North of the border, I can testify to the fact that Iowa has a large number and wide Array of historic bridges, whose history Dates back to the 1860s and whose Engineering Technology contributed to the way Transportation and infrastructure in the US has developed to this day. Here’s an account of one Family, who did a cross-country tour of the Hawkeye state and saw the cremé de la creme of bridges going from North to south. I hope you enjoy it and can use this as part of your vacation plan to visit the Midwest. Iowa does make a Person smile. 🙂

 

Source: Bridge Trip! 17 Historic Iowa Bridges We’ve Discovered

Hunter Station Bridge Imploded After Replacement Bridge Opens

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Oblique view. Photos taken by Nathan Holth in 2013

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OIL CITY, PA- Between through truss bridges which have an overhead chord and a deck truss, where the trusses are underneath the roadway, we have the half-through truss design. This consists of a truss bridge, whose roadway is wedged right in the middle of the truss itself. This means the truss can be seen both when driving by car on the road or boating underneath. Only a handful of These half-through truss bridges were constructed between 1880 and 1940, of which seven existed, including two with overhead bracings that cover the roadway, resembling a true through truss bridge.

Since October 4th of the year, that number has been reduced to one. The Hunter Station Bridge, a three-span Pratt half-through truss Bridge spanning the Allegheny River at US Highway 62 between Oil City and Lighthouse Island in Forrest County was dropped with explosives last week, two months after ist replacement span was open to traffic. The 1050-foot Long span was built in 1934 by P.I. Cox Construction Company featured a 30° skewed overhead chord with X-laced portal bracings encased in a C-beam form that can be seen as a beam portal upon entering the bridge. The strut bracings are all X-laced and uncovered. The roadway is wedged between the riveted trusses, even though a sidewalk existed on one side.  The structure was listed as eligible for the National Register of Historic Places, but it was not enough for the it to be saved, for years of neglect with rusted trusses and damages to concrete and steel railings led to PennDOT to replace the structure with the new span. Construction started last year and traffic shifted onto the new bridge in July, when it was completed to traffic.

With the Hunter Station Bridge now gone, only six half-through truss bridges exist in the US, 10 worldwide. This includes the Purdon Bridge near Nevada City, California, the last of ist Kind with an overhead chord. The pin-connected Pratt design, built in 1889 by Cotton Brothers Construction in Oakland is listed on the National Register and still in use today. Other half-through trusses in the US without the overhead trusses include the Nemadji Railroad Bridge in Wisconsin, Dearborn Bridge in Montana, Hadley Bow in New York and High Bridge in Indiana. It is unknown whether another half-through truss bridge in South Carolina exists according to information from bridgehunter.com.

 

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Link: http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=truss/hunter/

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The old pillars of the former Blackfriars railway bridge — Memoirs Of A Metro Girl

If you walk along the Thames Path, or perhaps cross the River Thames via foot or train on the two Blackfriars Bridges, you may have noticed these pieces of unusual river furniture. Running from north to south are pairs of red pillars, which used to support the original railway bridge before it was dismantled in […]

via The old pillars of the former Blackfriars railway bridge — Memoirs Of A Metro Girl

Robert Stephenson’s Aerial Tubeway (Britannia Bridge, Menai Strait, Wales, UK) — The Beauty of Transport

I sometimes wonder if drivers using the Britannia Bridge ever appreciate the fact that they shouldn’t really be there at all. But for one of British railway architecture/engineering’s more unfortunate moments, the Britannia Bridge might well have remained what it originally was, a railway bridge pure and simple. Straddling the Menai Strait between Anglesey and […]

via Robert Stephenson’s Aerial Tubeway (Britannia Bridge, Menai Strait, Wales, UK) — The Beauty of Transport