2016 Ammann Awards Ballot Part II

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BEST KEPT SECRET TOUR GUIDE:

US:

The Bridges of Boone County, Iowa– Minus the now removed Wagon Wheel Bridge, this county is rich with history involving its bridges, one of which involved a hero who averted a potential disaster in Kate Shelley.

The Crossings along the Chesapeake-Ohio Canal– Built in 1828, the canal system serves four states and provides water to Washington. It also features some of the oldest arch bridges in the country, some of which have been restored since 2005.

The Arch Bridges of Cowley County, Kansas– Until this year, 17 arch bridges served the county, most of which were built between 1890 and 1920 and made of stone. One of the bridges succumbed to flooding this spring.

The Bridges of Cincinnati/ Covington– Several bridges, big and small, old and young can be found in this metropolis, including John Roebling’s suspension bridge built in 1869, one year before his death on the Brooklyn Bridge.

The Bridges of Washington County, Maryland– 22 historic stone arch structures span Conococheague Creek and Antietam Creek, and its tributaries, including Wilson’s Bridge, a 210-foot long bridge built in 1819. Most of the structures are almost 200-years old.

The Bridges of Tompkins County, New York– Over two dozen bridges are found in this county that are historically significant, including their centerpiece, the Newfield Covered Bridge.

International:

Glauchau (Saxony)– Several arch bridges span the Mulde as well as on the hill leading to the castles. As a bonus, a covered bridge and an iron bridge can be found here.

Zwickau (Saxony) – It is extremely rare for a town to have a 500-year old covered bridge with a very unusual design, a cantilever pony truss bridge and an unusual through truss bridge in a community, but Zwickau has that and more.

The Canal Bridges of Brugges (Belgium)– several stone arch bridges span the canals serving this historic community.

Calgary, Alberta– Two dozen bridges, modern and historic serve this Canadian community including those on the city’s historic registry.

The River Tyne- Flowing through Newcastle and Gateshead, this river features 22 improtant bridges as it flows into the North Sea from the eastern UK.

The Bridges of Newark on Trent– Like Glauchau, Newark has 27,000 inhabitants and a wide-array of well-known bridges- ten of them.

The Bridges of Dublin, Ireland– Many bridges from different periods of time can be found here. This includes a pair of cable-stayed bridges, three arch bridges and a couple truss bridges.

BEST KEPT SECRET INDIVIDUAL:

US:

Good Thunder Railroad Bridge in Minnesota

Sibley Railroad Bridge in Missouri

Marais des Cygnes River Bridge in Kansas

Coalbrook Lake Bridge in Connecticut (was inundated until the drought)

The Purple People Bridge in Cincinnati

Clark’s Creek Bridge in Kansas

Clairemeont Avenue Railroad Bridge in Wisconsin

International:

Isabella Viaduct in Puerto Rico

Röhrensteg Pedestrian Bridge in Zwickau, Germany

Ribblehead Viaduct in the Yorkshire Dales National Park (UK)

Anderton Boat Lift in Cheshire (UK)- photo included here

Sandford Drawbridge in Nova Scotia (Canada)- the world’s smallest bascule bridge

Prince Alfred Bridge in New South Wales (Australia)

Rosa Luxemburg Bridges in Berlin, Germany

Abteibrücke in Berlin, Germany

Bowenfels Railroad Viaduct in New South Wales (Australia)

Hangeseilbrucke, Geierlay, Germany

Sinking Bridge in Corinth, Greece

BRIDGE OF THE YEAR:

Clark’s Creek Bridge in Geary County, Kansas

Paradiesbrücke in Zwickau, Germany

Röhrensteg in Zwickau, Germany

Times Beach (US 66) Bridge in Missouri

Augusta Bridge in Kansas

Fehmarn Bridge in Germany

Hayden Bridge in Oregon

Springfield Bowstring Arch Bridge in Arkansas

Green Bridge in Des Moines, Iowa

Dodd Ford Bridge in Minnesota

Gasconade (US 66) Bridge in Missouri

Sinking Bridge in Corinth, Greece

White River Bridge in Clarendon, Arkansas

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