Linz Railroad Bridge to be Demolished

The Railway Bridge at night but in black and white. Photo courtesy of Madeleine Schneider
The Railway Bridge at night but in black and white. Photo courtesy of Madeleine Schneider

69% of the voters want a new bridge. Demolition and replacement to commence soon.

LINZ, AUSTRIA- The elections in Linz and the region of Upper Austria brought a lot of surprises as far as results are concerned, with the Austrian Volkspartei and the Free Democrats taking the first two places and the political mentality shifting right. The mentality of the citizens of Linz seems to in the right as well, as the majority of the population voted to say good-bye to the old lady over the Danube River today.

After nearly two years of campaigning for and against a new bridge, 68.1% of the population voted in favor of demolishing the three-span curved Whipple through truss bridge, which had been serving traffic for over a century. Already, Linz’s mayor Klaus Luger had already started planning for a new crossing, whose construction is scheduled to begin sometime next year and is expected to last 2-3 years. The new crossing will be a three-span tied-arch bridge with Warren truss features, providing six lanes of traffic including rail and bike lanes. The question was whether a two-bridge solution would be realistic in financial terms. Today’s vote sent a clear message, favoring Luger’s campaign to remove the old structure and put his prized work in its new place.

However, the bridge, which had its Historic Significance status removed by the Austrian Heritage Office last year, may have an afterlife, for plans are in the making to convert the center span into a floating park, resting on pontoons and located adjacent to the new bridge. Whether this plan of salvaging one of the three spans will bear fruit depends on the amount of money and support available. Yet the plan will be similar to the proposal to convert the truss spans of the eastern half of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge into passive housing. The 1936 bridge has been replaced with a cable-stayed span and is being dismantled for that purpose.

Still after years of effort, it appears that the majority would like to see the bridge go, as it has lived its useful life. And while the group and other preservationists are still asking why, they can be given credit for getting the message out there, and receiving as much support despite fighting a battle that is now lost.  One can hope that a small part of history can be saved and reused as a marker indicating how important the bridge was to the history of Linz as well as civil engineering.

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