Mystery Bridge Nr. 53: The Estate Bridge at Staffordshire, UK

Lichfield Drive Bridge at Shugborough Park in Staffordshire. Photo taken by Paul Hunt, used with permission.
Lichfield Drive Bridge at Shugborough Park in Staffordshire. Photo taken by Paul Hunt, used with permission.

After a nearly six-month absence due to many commitments combined with an upgrade of the Chronicles to website status, we will now open up the 2015 Mystery Bridge gallery, with our first bridge being a rather unique one located (hold your breath!)-

In England!

The United Kingdom is famous for its numerous, rather ornamental bridges- some made of steel, but many made of concrete and/or brick. This bridge, located at Lichfield Drive in Colwich, in the district of Staffordshire, is one of those examples that stand out as a unique ornamental bridge made of concrete. Once spanning a railroad line that is now a path, this bridge, according to records from English Heritage, was built in 1847. The main span is a closed spandrel elliptical arch bridge made of brick. A figure head is at the keystone of the arch span. Columns on both sides support the remaining structure with lower rounded ballustrade railings curving over the bridge from piling to piling. Rounded engraved medallions can be found on the stone blocks on the outer edge of the bridge on the deck, and sculptures can be found on the bridge’s ballustrades.

The bridge is uniqueness in design is overshadowed by the lack of information available on the structure. In particular, we do not know who built the bridge, let alone who was behind the design. England has had many engineers who left their landmarks in history, including I.K. Brunel (who built the Clifton Suspension Bridge), Sir John Fowler, who built the Firth of Forth Railroad Bridge, and Thomas Telford, who masterminded the construction of numerous railroad bridges. But we do not know who built this bridge, whether it was the aforementioned engineers or someone else.

This is where your help comes in.

If you know of the history of this unique bridge that you would like to share, please add your comments below or contact Jason Smith at the Chronicles, using the contact information in the About the Chronicles page. You can also add your comments in the Chronicles’ facebook page as it is also a platform to discuss the history of this bridge.

There is a story behind the beauty of bridges like this one, and with a little help, we can find out more about the bridge at Colwich so that it deserves the recognition of a national historic landmark. Best of luck with finding the information and may we solve the mystery of this bridge. 🙂

The author would like to thank Paul Hunt for allowing usage of the bridge. 

Please click here to find out where the bridge is located. Map courtesy of Google Map.

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